blast from the past

blast from the past
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annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1994:
Jersey Joe Walcott
    Arnold Raymond Cream better known as Jersey Joe Walcott, was an American world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's Heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years, 168 days.

    That record would eventually be broken on November 5, 1994, by 45-year-old George Foreman, who defeated the 26-year-old Heavyweight champion of the world Michael Moorer, to win the WBA and IBF heavyweight titles.

    Walcott was born in Pennsauken, New Jersey. His father was an immigrant from St. Thomas, Danish West Indies. His mother was from Jordantown, New Jersey. Walcott was only 15 years old when his father died.

    He quit school and worked in a soup factory to support his mother and 11 younger brothers and sisters. He also began training as a boxer. He took the name of his boxing idol, Joe Walcott, a welterweight champion from Barbados. He added "Jersey" to distinguish himself and show where he was from.

    He debuted as a professional boxer on September 9, 1930, fighting Cowboy Wallace and winning by a knockout in round one. After five straight knockout wins, in 1933, he lost for the first time, beaten on points by Henry Wilson in Philadelphia.

    On December 5, 1947, he fought Joe Louis, at thirty-three years of age breaking the record as the oldest man to fight for the world heavyweight title. Despite dropping Louis in round one, and once again in round four, he lost a 15 round split decision. Most ringside observers and boxing writers felt Walcott deserved the win, and so there was a rematch on June 25, 1948, when Louis prevailed once again, this time by a knockout in round 11.

    June 22 of 1949, Walcott got another chance to become world heavyweight champion, when he and Ezzard Charles met for the title left vacant by Louis. However, Charles prevailed, winning by decision in 15 rounds. Walcott, disappointed but eager to see his dream of being a champion come true, went on, and in 1950, he won four of his five bouts, including a three round knockout of future world light heavyweight champion Harold Johnson.

    On March 7, 1951, he and Charles fought for the second time and once again Charles won a 15 round decision to retain his world title. But on July 18, he joined a handful of boxers who claimed the world title in their fifth try, when he knocked out Charles in seven rounds in Pittsburgh, to finally become world's heavyweight champion, at the relatively old age of 37.

    This made him the oldest man ever to win the world heavyweight crown (a distinction he would hold until George Foreman won the title at age 45 in 1994)

    Walcott retained the title with a 15 round decision victory against arch-enemy Charles. On September 23, 1952, he defended his title for the second time. His opponent was the undefeated Rocky Marciano. In the first round Marciano was knocked down with a left hook for the first time in his career. Walcott was clearly ahead in the scoring and Marciano needed a knockout to win, according to two of the three official scorecards.

    In the thirteenth round with Marciano pressuring Walcott against the ropes, both threw simultaneous right hands. Marciano landed his punch first on Walcott´s jaw in what is considered one of the hardest punches thrown in boxing history.

    Walcott collapsed with his arm hanging over the ropes then fell to the canvas where he was counted out. There was a rematch in Chicago, on May 15, 1953, and the second time around, Walcott was again defeated by Marciano by a knockout in the first round.

    What did Jersey Joe Walcott's life exemplify? That it doesn't matter how old you are if you want to pursue a goal, by all means, go for it, but don't go for it half ass, give it your all and take what belongs to you.

    Jersey Joe Walcott fought some of the best fighters of his day, got knocked down and got right back up. He never had a quitting attitude until his goal was accomplished. What a great example for us today. Thanks, Joe. We proudly honor your memory with the 1994 Hamite Award.

    Jersey Joe Walcott died on February 25, 1994 at the age of 80.

Jersey Joe Walcott
Jersey Joe Walcott
photo #104-yr-1952




Jersey Joe Walcott Style And Grace




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How were blacks feeling in 1994?
happy mood of blacks


oj simpson police pursuit


welcome to the 90s



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NEWS AROUND THE WORLD IN 1994

The whole world watched and did nothing


Genocide in Rwanda 1994




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Tommie Smith  and John Carlos black power salute
Tommie Smith and John Carlos
Three Proud People mural in Newtown photo #109

DID YOU KNOW?
    Ever wonder how the term "African American" came into existence? After the civil rights movement, blacks felt the need for a more accurate term to describe the race than colored or Negro, which was associated with much pain and suffering. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, blacks no longer approved of the term Negro. In its experimental stages the term Afro-American was used for a while but didn't last. Later the Black Power movement made us feel proud using black as the term in describing our race.

    The song, "Say It Loud – I'm Black, and I'm Proud" by James Brown became an unofficial anthem of the Black Power movement. But it wasn't until the 1980s the term African American was advanced on the model of, for example, German-American or Irish-American to give descendants of American slaves and other American blacks who lived through the slavery era a heritage and a cultural base. The term was popularized in black communities around the country via word of mouth and ultimately received mainstream use after Jesse Jackson publicly used the term in front of a national audience. Subsequently, major media outlets adopted its use.

Proud to be African American


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blacks and basketball

David Robinson
David Robinson
photo #103-yr-1986

Rickey Henderson
Rickey Henderson
photo #111-yr-1979

Barry Bonds
Barry Bonds
photo #101-yr-1994


George Foreman vs Michael Moorer 1994 - Heavyweight Championship


      Sports in 1994
  • 1994 - David Robinson is the NBA Scoring Champion.

  • February 14, 1994 - The second ESPY Awards goes to Barry Bonds and Julie Krone.

  • April 22, 1994 - Boxer Michael Moorer defeats a tough Evander Holyfield for the heavyweight boxing title.

  • May 14, 1994 - Baseball's Dave Winfield surpasses Frank Robinson for 12th place on RBI list with 1,617.

  • June 7, 1994 - Outstanding A's outfielder Rickey Henderson steals an amazing 1,100th career bases.

  • September 25, 1994 - Boxer Oliver McCall knocks out Lennox Lewis in the 2nd round for the heavyweight boxing title. Trivia:  As a result of his loss, Lennox Lewis' planned super fight with Bowe was cancelled. Lewis, however, attempted to gain a rematch with McCall and offered him $10 million to accept it. McCall refused the offer claiming that he was disrespected by Lewis' post-fight comments of being "robbed" of the title. Lewis' promoter Dan Duva responded to McCall's refusal by stating that "That just shows to me they want to babysit the title until Tyson gets out," referring to former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson's release from prison expected sometime in 1995. McCall instead took a fight against Larry Holmes in April 1995, with the aging former champion seeking to join 46-year old George Foreman as a reigning champion in his forties. After barely beating Holmes in a close decision, McCall lost his title to veteran British heavyweight Frank Bruno in London. Meanwhile, Lewis and Bowe came to terms on a contract for a fight in the fall of 1996 but after Bowe's poor performance in a tuneup against Andrew Golota the fight was canceled and Lewis began trying to regain his title. Years later Lewis would eventually get a rematch with McCall, who was the #2 contender, for the vacant title. In one of the most bizarre fights in boxing history, McCall refused to fight in the fourth and fifth round and began crying, causing the referee to stop the fight and award Lewis the victory by technical knockout.

  • November 5, 1994 - Boxer George Foreman knocks out a game Michael Moorer to win the heavyweight boxing title.



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watermelon slaves food
DID YOU KNOW?
    Ever wonder how the soul-food revolution began? It became a popular term in the 1960's. Slave ships with their cargo of slaves traveled from West Africa to North America with foods that were native to African soil. It was the ship's captain best interest to keep slaves alive and healthy by feeding them these foods for their long transatlantic voyage. Some of these foods native to Africa are black-eyed peas, rice, yams, peanuts and don't forget the infamous watermelon. Once here in America, slaves were allowed to grow these foods and along with the scraps the master would give them during 'ration times' (sometimes meat) is what laid the foundation for soul-food.


watermelon slaves food


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WAR ON BLACKS, OR ALSO KNOWN AS WAR ON DRUGS

Mass Incarceration


law and order
Convicts Leased to Harvest Timber, around 1915, Florida
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Convicts_Leased_to_Harvest_Timber.png
(public domain image)


    The more things change, the more they stay the same


Shortly after slavery, blacks were thrown into prison for petty and minor offenses which resulted in long sentences. It was big business for the penitentiary because they would hire these convicts out for various jobs and keep blacks off the streets at the same time. They killed two birds with one stone.


It was a form of bondage that did not last a lifetime and did not automatically extend from one generation to the next. But it was nonetheless slavery – a system in which armies of free men, guilty of no crimes and entitled by law to freedom, were compelled to labor without compensation, were repeatedly bought and sold, and were forced to do the bidding of white masters through the regular application of extraordinary physical coercion.


This form of slavery was abolished by President Franklin D. Roosevelt December 12, 1941.


Is the criminal justise system much different today?


President Richard Nixon started the modern day Law and Order campaign of the War on Drugs. President Ronald Reagan would continue with the program in his administration, and later President Bill Clinton during his term created tough mandatory sentencing that unfairly affected blacks.

Crack cocaine was associated with poor blacks because it was a cheap drug and in contrast with powder cocaine which was considered a white man's drug because it was more expensive. Neither drug was more deadly than the other, but crack was demonized because it was associated with black people.

While a person found with five grams of crack cocaine faced a five-year mandatory minimum prison sentence, a person holding powder cocaine could receive the same sentence only if he or she held five hundred grams. Similarly, those carrying ten grams of crack cocaine faced a ten-year mandatory sentence, while possession of one thousand grams of powder cocaine was required for the same sentence to be imposed.

Don't get it wrong, these were very well ORGANIZED methods from anti-Americans in control of our country to hold blacks down and is very well documented. It seems these anti-Americans are always reinventing themselves in ways of oppressing black citizens. Perhaps they should show some love for a change instead of acting on their imagined fear.


WHO IS THIS MAN?


John Ehrlichman


John Ehrlichman who was counsel to President Richard Nixon and would later become a criminal himself with his involvement in the Watergate scandal made the following comment about the reason for Nixon's war on drugs:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course, we did.”



Check these statistics out

One of every three black American males born today can expect to go to prison in his lifetime. While black defendants account for roughly 80% of those arrested for crack-related offenses, public health data has found that two-thirds of crack cocaine users are white or Hispanic. The leading cause of incarceration of an African American male is a non-violent drug offense. Most black men in prisons are not monsters but just got caught up in the system for a non-violent mistake they may have made.

These stats are for the years 1970 - 2010



1 in every 106 White males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 36 Hispanic males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 15 Black males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order


    We have to help our black boys because nobody else cares. Wouldn't it be nice if today's blacks possessed the same gumption our African American ancestors had by taking control of our destiny as a race of people? It seems ever since the end of slavery we are always pointing out to the white man how unfair and unjust he has treated us. Don't you think he knows that? What do we expect them to do, start crying and say I'm sorry and start treating us like fellow Americans by sharing freely? Don't hold your breath.


    At this point in history, it's clear we must begin to work on ourselves more than anything else. We've probably gone just about as far as we can go with the protesting/marching strategy which was an excellent choice over the decades, but now it's time for action on our part. MLK would have likely said the same thing.


    A very unpopular message for many blacks who live with the self-pity attitude but the only avenue available for American success. Can you imagine how much it would lift our race if every single black boy possessed a college degree? It's a dream that could become a reality if we believed it.


    Education plays the significant role in American success for blacks and any group of blacks in a position of authority such as sports figures, entertainers, singers, etc. that teaches the opposite by their examples we should run away from them as fast as possible. Sadly, these groups are the ones that many blacks look up to for guidance instead of our black educators.


    When one of us climbs the very challenging and racist ladder of success in the American power structure by using our God-given brain power we will not forget about those we left behind, but instead will help other blacks do the same by extending a hand until we find ourselves in a position of directing instead of always asking and begging.


    Our ancestors knew we could do it and we have to believe it too. We are from some of the strongest and finest stock that is known to humankind and should set the example for all dark skinned people over the entire earth simply because we are in a position to do so and live in the greatest country in the world. Our story is one of the greatest ever told. We are AmazingBlacks.



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HOW LONG WILL WHITE-AMERICANS
SIT ON THE FENCE?




whites sitting on fence

The purpose of this feature is to arrive at an honest and reliable answer how white Americans feel about black citizens. What better way to accomplish this than to examine its past leaders who represented the communities they served. The three greatest Presidents in American history are revisited for their treatment of black people. Their actions or inactions will without a doubt give us a clue.


GEORGE WASHINGTON

George Washington is considered the Father of our country. His contemporaries which included men such as John Adams, John Dickinson, and Willam Whipple just to name a few disliked slavery. Whipple, who was a signer of the Declaration couldn't bring himself to sign the document without first freeing his slave and Dickinson did the same. These men, among others, sincerely believed in the principle that all men are created equal and have the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness.


Another of Washington's contemporaries was British author Thomas Day who made the following comment about America's founders:

"If there be an object truly ridiculous in nature, it is an American patriot, signing resolutions of independency with the one hand, and with the other brandishing a whip over his affrighted slaves."


While the Declaration was being created and debated most founders were content in sweeping the slave issue under the rug by leaving out much mention of black slaves because many of them were slaveholders themselves and figured this would make them look like hypocrites.


During the war, the colonist and British actively sought and recruited black slaves to fight and promised freedom after the victory. It's well recorded that slaves fought with courage and valor that ensured American success. George Washington himself remarked in writing:

Washington wrote a letter to Colonel Henry Lee III stating that success in the war would come to whatever side could arm the blacks the fastest.


whites sitting on fence

But after victory, America didn't keep its promises, and most blacks were forced back into slavery. Of course, George Washington had to know about this but did nothing. Washington had many slaves himself and didn't want to free them and damage his financial stake. History shows he put money interests ahead of principle. Washington was a brilliant soldier but failed as an upholder of truth and justice. As a leader, Washington's inaction would set the tone for future race relations in our country.


Washington had trivialized the principle of human rights for black people, the very complaint the Patriots had against England and the reason the war was fought. It's sad to say, but Washington didn't stay in the truth, but at least the British kept their promise by shipping the many blacks who fought on their side to Sierra Leone Africa and Nova Scotia for a new life.



ABRAHAM LINCOLN

In contrast to George Washington, Abraham Lincoln evidently didn't share Washington's view of the principles this country was founded. Lincoln was an ardent lover of truth and democracy. He took pride in doing the right thing. We must be honest in saying Lincoln had adamant opinions how he felt about black people personally. He would go on to make the following quotes;

"As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this to the extent of the difference, is no democracy."


"I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races.... But I hold that ... there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence, the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."


"Nearly eighty years ago we began by declaring that all men are created equal; but now from that beginning, we have run down to the other declaration, that for some men to enslave others is a "sacred right of self-government." Our republican robe is soiled and trailed in the dust.… Let us repurify it. Let us re-adopt the Declaration of Independence, and with it, the practices, and policy, which harmonize with it.… If we do this, we shall not only have saved the Union: but we shall have saved it, as to make, and keep it, forever worthy of the saving."


Now it's very clear from the many negative comments Abraham Lincoln made against black people he wasn't likely to have them over for dinner or have any other social interaction. But if living in our day would have probably changed his views. He was well known for his ability to adapt. So why was he a great President?


Because even though Lincoln felt blacks were not equal, he still felt they should be able to enjoy all the rights a white person did. HOW COURAGEOUS! Lincoln went against the grain and chose to institute the Emancipation Proclamation which freed the slaves and Reconstruction Acts that would eventually give blacks citizenship and the right to vote.


whites sitting on fence

Lincoln understood what every single President in American history ignored, and that the most important thing for America to keep sacred was upholding the principles of human rights and equality for all. Something that had never been accomplished in any government of humankind's history. Throughout the years all U.S. Presidents bowed down to racist white power and sold out these principles.



FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

During the Roosevelt administration, America would proclaim itself a moral leader of the entire world for human rights and democracy. Without a doubt, this opened the door for the advancement of black people. This was when The Black Cabinet who were an informal group of African-American public policy advisors to the President came into existence, an accomplishment unheard of up until that time.


Roosevelt also issued Executive Order 8802, which created the Fair Employment Practice Committee (FEPC) which was the most significant federal move in support of the rights of African-Americans between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The President's order stated that the federal government would not hire any person based on their race, color, creed, or national origin. Millions of blacks and women achieved better jobs and better pay as a result.


In 1942, at Eleanor's instigation, Roosevelt met with a delegation of African-American leaders, who demanded full integration into the armed forces, including the right to serve in combat roles and the Navy, the Marine Corps and the United States Army Air Forces. Roosevelt agreed, but then did nothing to implement his promise.


Roosevelt also had a Vice President named Henry Wallace who was a true lover of democracy, justice, and liberty for all. Wallace was a different breed of people of his day because he believed all races were equal in America and weren't afraid to voice this. But sadly, Roosevelt didn't support Wallace as Vice President for his final term in office choosing instead go with Harry Truman who as a younger man once voiced how he felt about non-whites:

"I think one man is as good as another as long as he's decent and honest and not a nigger or a Chinaman. The Lord made the man out of dust, the nigger from mud and threw up what was left to create the Chinaman."


whites sitting on fence

Roosevelt was a mixed bag when it came to upholding the principles the nation was founded. For example, there were black leaders during his administration who petitioned the United Nations with the declaration of Genocide that the government was committing against blacks. Roosevelt failed to see the importance of being proactive in upholding the principles of the Declaration of Independence for all citizens.


What can we learn from these three great men?


The one most important observation is there weren't any of these Presidents who sincerely liked black people, and throughout the years America's white citizens haven't been any different. The honest truth is whites don't care for blacks as brothers. In their eyes, it's either white superiority or black superiority and forget all that brother crap.


But on the other hand black people view themselves as Americans and don't understand why they can't be looked upon and treated the same as an Irish American, Italian American, English American, Polish American, etc. and are always seeking inclusion as one big happy American family which makes total sense but sad to say many whites can't truthfully see beyond color (which represents advantage).


When it's all said and done racism exist because of money and pride. Just imagine if every single black person in America was a millionaire and lacked for nothing and controlled the purse strings with all white people in extreme poverty begging and eating out of garbage cans. This would eliminate the bulk of racism because whites wouldn't have any power.


Money=power, but money doesn't have to equal hate, it what the one with the power chooses to do with it. This is where pride comes in because all racist feel they are special people and their way of doing things is the best way, the superior way and the only way as far as they are concerned. People have the power to opt for love, but always choose selfishness and hate.


Because of this, America has never been the one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all we see on television, and being the father of our country, George Washington started these false beliefs and practices.


Generally speaking, white citizens today are not much different than these three past Presidents and through the years have become three distinct classes:


(1) George Washington class: This shortsighted and selfish class puts money and greed interest ahead of principle that would promote peace and harmony for the whole.


(2) Abraham Lincoln class: This class puts the welfare of whole first and recognizes this earth doesn't belong to one single group of people and must be truthfully shared equitably.


(3) Franklin D. Roosevelt class: This class hopes for the best but won't lift a finger in achieving that. This class straddles the fence and can sympathize with both the Washington and the Lincoln class. They are wishy-washy and travels where the winds blow them.


It's important to remember that all three classes don't particularity like blacks and have minimal association with them if any, and this is said because even today it's rare for the races to mingle and when they do can be uncomfortable in a social setting, how ridiculous! The race with the power is the only one that can change this for the better. It's that simple.


In a sense, Washington created the blueprint for a distorted and false view of American principles that became the norm in much of America's dealings with black people. Abraham Lincoln tried to do away with this damaging logic and desired America to live up to the principles it was founded and died for his beliefs. Roosevelt dabbled on either side by sitting on the fence of inaction and did little for principle because being partakers of a privileged life was more advantageous to his class.


The danger of this, of course, was that in continuing to undermine principle, the prospect would exist of being faced with an America that wouldn't be recognizable. Lincoln was the only President to understand and appreciate this danger.


whites sitting on fence


“Ignorance of how we are shaped racially is the first sign of privilege. In other words. It is a privilege to ignore the consequences of race in America.”  Tim Wise


So has America changed, if yes, what has she become?


Good question, but you must answer yourself.


But there are many more questions that need to be answered. Because of the folly of greed and racism and lack of action to speak out by the real Americans, has this country morphed into another form of power that is completely different than it started out? Has it become like an insatiable, greedy, detestable and ugly monster without a soul or conscience?


whites sitting on fence





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blacks and politics

President Bill Clinton
President Bill Clinton
photo #110-yr-1993

Richard M. Nixon
Richard M. Nixon
photo #106-yr-1969

Ron Kirk
Ron Kirk
photo #102-yr-1995

      Political Scene in 1994
  • 1994 - Bill Clinton an American Democratic politician who served as the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001 was inaugurated into office. He previously served as Governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992, and as the state's Attorney General from 1977 to 1979.

  • April 18, 1994 - Former President Richard Nixon suffered a stroke and dies four days later. Analysis:  Farewell Richard Nixon, We don't think you were a real crook, no different than your fellow politicians, you just got caught. RIP

  • 1994 - Ron Kirk worked as the Secretary of State of Texas in 1994, until he was elected as the Mayor of Dallas, where he served from 1995 to 2002 and was the first African-American to hold either of those positions.



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The Race Factor


racism

      Race in 1994
  • February 5, 1994 - Civil Right's leader Medgar Evers' murderer Byron De La Beckwith is finally sentenced to life in prison thirty years after the crime.

  • April 19, 1994 - Rodney King awarded $3,800,000 in compensation for assault by police.



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black professional women


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slang and memorable quotes
black slang      sLANG tALK in the 1990s
  • Sup - What's up

  • Aiight - Alright, okay

  • All That - Complete package, not lacking

  • All that and a bag a chips - Complete

  • Bangin'/Slammin' - Got it going on

  • Beef - Trouble with someone

  • Beeotch - Bitch

  • Bling-Bling - Jewelry

  • The Bomb - Perfect, out of this world

  • Boo Ya! - In your face sucka

  • Bounce - To leave, go

  • Cha-Ching - Ring it up, gonna cost

  • Cheddar - Money, greenback

  • Chill Out - Relax

  • Chillin' - Relaxing

  • Churrin - Kids, children

  • Crib - The house, pad

  • Damn Skippy - You got that right!

  • Dawg - Friend, term of endearment

  • Dis - Disrepect

  • Dope - Super cool, badd

  • Down With That - In agreement

  • Fine - The best

  • Finna - About to do something

  • Fly - Cool, something good

  • Fresh - Brand new, cool, great

  • Hella - Emphasis

  • Hoochie - Fast, easy girl

  • Hood - Your neighborhood

  • It's all good - Everything is OK, under control

  • Jack You Up - Hurt you badly

  • Jet - Leave quickly

  • Let's Role - Leave

  • Math - Phone number

  • My Bad - My mistake, I'm sorry

  • O.G. - Original Ganster

  • Oh Snaps! - Oh yeah that's right!

  • Old School - Old way of doing things

  • Paper - Money

  • Phat - Cool

  • Pimpin - Correctly done

  • Po-po - Police

  • Scrub - A guy that's lacking

  • Straight - Telling the whole truth

  • Throw Down - Fight

  • Trippin - Worried about something

  • Vibe - Feeling

  • Wack - Terrible, not good

  • Wangsta - A fake ganster

  • Word - In agreement

  • Yayo - Money

  • Yo - Hello, short for "your"



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black Movies in America

Ellen Cleghorne
Ellen Cleghorne
photo #100-yr-1991

John Jordan  ONeil
John Jordan "Buck" O'Neil
photo #101-yr-2006


Prince on Late Show, December 13, 1994


     Television / Movies in 1994
    Movies:
  • June 15, 1994 - Disney's animated musical film "The Lion King" opens in theaters with an impressive $42 million dollars.

  • That's Entertainment! III - Lena Horne (a documentary film)

  • A Century of Cinema - a 1994 documentary directed by Caroline Thomas about the art of filmmaking. (Richard Pryor)



  • Television:
  • Ellen Cleghorne is an American actress and comedian, best known for being a cast member of Saturday Night Live from 1991 to 1995.

  • Buck O'Neil gained national prominence with his compelling descriptions of the Negro leagues as part of Ken Burns' 1994 PBS documentary on baseball.



  • Awards:
    September 29, 1994 - Soul singers Pointer Sisters receive a much deserved star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.




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happy birthday

     Famous Birthdays in 1994
  • March 2, 1994 - Kofi Siriboe  an American actor whose works have spanned theatre, film, and television. He is most notable for his role as Javy Hall in the Fred Durst directed movie The Longshots.



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african americans and death

 Hilda Simms
Hilda Simms
- photo#101-yr-1918 -

Wilma  Rudolph
Wilma Rudolph
photo #107-yr-1940

Jersey Joe Walcott
Jersey Joe Walcott
photo #104-yr-1952

Woody Strode
Woody Strode
photo #111-yr-1914

     Famous Deaths in 1994
  • February 6, 1994 - Hilda Simms was an African-American stage actress, best known for her starring role on Broadway in Anna Lucasta. Trivia: Hilda's mother who was a devout Catholic refused to see her perform because she stated she would not watch her daughter play a prostitute, she didn't raise her that way.

  • February 14, 1994 - George "Tiger" Haynes  sometimes billed as Colonel Tiger Haynes, was an American actor and jazz musician.

  • February 25, 1994 - Jersey Joe Walcott was an American world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years old.

  • June 28, 1994 - Fredi Washington  was an accomplished African-American dramatic film actress, one of the first to gain recognition for her work in film and on stage.

  • August 14, 1994 - Alice Childress  was an American playwright, actor, and author.

  • August 21, 1994 - Danitra Vance  was an American comedian and actress best known as a cast member on the NBC sketch show Saturday Night Live.

  • October 25, 1994 - Lillian Irene Hayman  was a Tony Award-winning American actress and singer.

  • November 10, 1994 - Carmen McRae  was an American jazz singer, composer, pianist, and actress. Considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th century, it was her behind-the-beat phrasing and her ironic interpretations of song lyrics that made her memorable.

  • November 12, 1994 - Wilma Rudolph was an American athlete and an Olympic champion. Rudolph was considered the fastest woman in the world in the 1960s and competed in two Olympic Games, in 1956 and in 1960.

  • November 13, 1994 - Jack Baker was an American actor.

  • November 18, 1994 - Cab Calloway was a jazz singer and bandleader. He was strongly associated with the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, where he was a regular performer.

  • November 19, 1994 - Dedrick D. Gobert  was an American film actor best known for his supporting role in the 1991 film Boyz n the Hood.

  • December 20, 1994 - Dick Campbell  was a key figure in black theater during the Harlem Renaissance.

  • December 31, 1994 - Woody Strode  was a decathlete and football star who went on to become a popular and pioneering African-American film actor.



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black leaders ashamed of our progress


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deceased hip-hop artist
  • Mo Thugs was an American hip hop collective from Cleveland, Ohio, formed and led by Bone Thugs-n-Harmony. Member Lil Boo The Caretaker was shot and killed in 1994.

  • Capital Punishment Organization, most commonly referred to as CPO, was a gangster rap group which formed in 1989. Member DJ Train, who had worked with artists such as MC Ren and J. J. Fad, died of smoke inhalation in a house fire on July 26, 1994.

  • Damian Dame was part of an American R&B duo. In 1991, the duo became the first act signed to LaFace Records. Damian Dame was killed in a car accident in Atlanta, Georgia on June 27, 1994.



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african americans and weddings

 Meadowlark Lemon
Meadowlark Lemon
photo #122-yr-2015

     Famous Weddings in 1994
  • March 13, 1994 - Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Sara Kapfer were wed.

  • April 30, 1994 - Pele and Assiria were wed.

  • June 25, 1994 - Joseph Simmons and Justine Jones were wed.

  • August 31, 1994 - R. Kelly and beautiful and talented Aaliyah were wed.

  • August 4, 1994 - Faith Evans  and Notorious B.I.G. were wed.

  • December 10, 1994 - Robert Scoville and Joel Rene were wed.

  • 1994 - Marlon Wayans  and Angela Zachary were wed.

  • 1994 - Wyclef Jean  and Marie Claudinette Jean were wed.

  • 1994 - Niecy Nash  and Don Nash were wed.

  • 1994 - Ving Rhames and Valerie Scott were wed.

  • 1994 - Jimmy Jam and Lisa Padilla were wed.

  • 1994 - Gina Neely and Patrick Neely were wed.

  • 1994 - August Wilson and Constanza Romero were wed.

  • 1994 - Marion Barry, Jr. and Cora Masters were wed.

  • 1994 - Meadowlark Lemon  and Dr. Cynthia Lemon were wed.



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famous african american divorces

Debbi  Morgan
Actress Debbi Morgan with Dorian Harewood in The Jesse Owens Story, 1984
photo #102-yr-1956

Barry Bonds
Barry Bonds
photo #101-yr-1994

     Famous Divorces in 1994
  • 1994 - Gary Dourdan and Roshumba Williams were divorced.

  • 1994 - Charles S. Dutton and Debbi Morgan were divorced.

  • 1994 - Barry Bonds and Susann Margreth were divorced.



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famous black/african american singers
Slaves kidnapped from their homes years ago belonged to tribes. Each tribe was as different as night and day to the next tribe.
famous black singers


They each had their individual languages and customs. So upon arriving in America they had to create a way to communicate with their master and each other, so over time they developed a spanking new and unique language called African American Vernacular English, and it didn't stop there.

Each group had their defined drum beat from their tribe that was added to the new way of life in the New World but with a new American twist with musical instruments they didn't have in Africa.

So to put it simply, soul or black music is a mixture of many different African beats incorporated into a new American culture. Think about how exciting that is, if it's possible to create anything positive at all from slavery it has to be African American music. It's admired all over the world.

We all originate from the same place, so it doesn't matter if we're listening to early 1900s blues singer "Ma Rainey" or the great 1940s singers "Billie Holiday" and "Nat King Cole" down to the famous rappers of our time such as the two late greats, "Biggie Smalls" or "Tupac", it all sounds good to us because we can feel and hear that beat.

Many cultures have contributed to the American way of life such as German Americans who introduced the Christmas tree tradition, or Italian Americans with their delicious pizza, or Mexican Americans with the tacos and tasty burritos, or the English Americans with their mainstays such as baseball and apple pie. The list goes on and on. To add to those contributions and without a doubt, soul music has changed the American way of life; it is truly an original, and one of our many proud contributions to our home here in America.
famous african american singers


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soul train
Soul Train ran from 1971-2006
photo #109-yr-1971

Mamie Smith
Mamie Smith
photo #106-yr-1883

Toni Braxton
Toni Braxton
photo #104-yr-1967

Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
photo #101-yr-1915

Janet Jackson
Janet Jackson
photo #104-yr-1994

Whitney Houston
Whitney Houston
photo #101-yr-1985

 Natalie Cole
Natalie Cole
photo #110-yr-1975

 Wynonie Harris
Wynonie Harris
photo #111-yr-1948


Toni Braxton-Another Sad Love Song(AMA 1994)



Snoop Dogg - "Gin and Juice" Live (1994)


     Music in 1994

  Billboard Top Soul Hits:
  • "Can We Talk" Tevin Campbell

  • "Cry for You" Jodeci

  • "Understanding" Xscape

  • "Bump n' Grind" R. Kelly

  • "Back & Forth" Aaliyah

  • "Any Time, Any Place" Janet Jackson

  • "I'll Make Love to You" Boyz II Men

  • "I Wanna Be Down" Brandy

  • "Practice What You Preach" Barry White

  • "Creep" TLC



  Popular Soul Dances:
  • The Hammer

  • Electric Slide

  • The Carlton

  • The Jiggy

  • Tootsee Roll

  • Rump Shaker

  • Da Dip

  • The Butterfly

  • The Funky Charleston

  • Macrena

  • The Humpy Dance



 Blues Hall of Fame for 1994:
    The Blues Hall of Fame is a music museum located in Memphis, Tennessee. Until recently, the "Blues Hall of Fame" was not a physical building, but a listing of people who have significantly contributed to blues music. Started in 1980 by the Blues Foundation, it honors those who have performed, recorded, or documented blues. The actual building for the hall opened to the public on May 8, 2015

  • Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup
  • Wynonie Harris


 American Music Awards winners in 1994:
    The 21st Annual American Music Awards were held on February 7, 1994. Whitney Houston was the big winner of the night, winning eight awards.

    Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist
  • Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Female Artist
  • Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Album
  • The Bodyguard Soundtrack - Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Single
  • "I Will Always Love You" - Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist
  • Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Female Artist
  • Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Band, Duo, or Group
  • En Vogue

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Album
  • The Bodyguard Soundtrack - Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Single
  • "I Will Always Love You" - Whitney Houston

  • Favorite Soul/R&B New Artist
  • Toni Braxton

  • Favorite Adult Contemporary Artist
  • Kenny G

  • Favorite Adult Contemporary Album
  • The Bodyguard Soundtrack - Whitney Houston

  • Favorite New Adult Contemporary Artist
  • Toni Braxton

  • Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist
  • Dr. Dre

  • Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop New Artist
  • Dr. Dre

  • Award of Merit
  • Whitney Houston



 Grammy winners in 1994:
    The 36th Annual Grammy Awards were held in 1994. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Whitney Houston was the Big Winner winning 3 awards including Record of the Year and Album of the Year.

    Record of the Year
  • Whitney Houston & David Foster (producer) for "I Will Always Love You"


  • Album of the Year
  • Whitney Houston & Babyface, BeBe Winans, David Cole, David Foster, L.A. Reid, Narada Michael Walden, Robert Clivilles, Clive Davis (producers) for The Bodyguard: Original Soundtrack Album


  • Song of the Year
  • Alan Menken & Tim Rice (songwriters) for "A Whole New World" performed by Peabo Bryson & Regina Belle


  • Best New Artist
  • Toni Braxton


  • Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
  • Whitney Houston for "I Will Always Love You"


  • Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal
  • Peabo Bryson & Regina Belle for "A Whole New World"


  • Best Pop Instrumental Performance
  • Branford Marsalis & Bruce Hornsby for "Barcelona Mona"


  • Best Traditional Blues Album
  • Blues Summit -B.B. King


  • Best Contemporary Blues Album
  • Feels Like Rain-Buddy Guy


  • Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or for Television
  • Alan Menken & Tim Rice (songwriters) for "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)" performed by Regina Belle & Peabo Bryson


  • Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album
  • Shirley Caesar for Stand Still


  • Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album
  • The Winans for All Out


  • Best Gospel Album by a Choir or Chorus
  • Carol Cymbala (choir director) for Live...We Come Rejoicing performed by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir


  • Best Historical Album
  • for The Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959


  • Best Jazz Instrumental Solo
  • Joe Henderson for "Miles Ahead"


  • Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Individual or Group
  • Joe Henderson for So Near, So Far (Musings for Miles)


  • Best Large Jazz Ensemble Performance
  • Miles Davis & Quincy Jones for Miles and Quincy Live at Montreux


  • Best Jazz Vocal Performance
  • Natalie Cole for Take a Look


  • Best Recording Package
  • for The Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959 performed by Billie Holiday


  • Best Album Notes
  • for The Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959 performed by Billie Holiday


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
  • Toni Braxton for "Another Sad Love Song"


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
  • Ray Charles for "A Song for You"


  • Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal
  • Sade for "No Ordinary Love"


  • Best Rhythm & Blues Song
  • Janet Jackson, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis (songwriters) for "That's the Way Love Goes" performed by Janet Jackson


  • Best Rap Solo Performance
  • Dr. Dre for "Let Me Ride"


  • Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group
  • Digable Planets for "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)"


  • Best Reggae Album
  • Inner Circle for "Bad Boys"


  • Best Spoken Word or Non-musical Album
  • Maya Angelou for On the Pulse of Morning


  • Grammy Legend Award
  • Curtis Mayfield
  • Frank Sinatra


  • Grammy Hall of Fame Award
  • Mamie Smith's "Crazy Blues"




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womens fashion
Young woman wearing a spaghetti strap top, a silver necklace, and straight-leg jeans
photo #111-yr-1990

mens fashion
Double breasted power suit with large shoulder pads
photo #112-yr-1990

 Converse All-Stars
A classic dark blue pair of Converse All-Stars resting on the Black & White Ed. Shoebox
photo #109-yr-1990

 Slap bracelets
Slap bracelets
photo #110-yr-1990

hairstyles in the 1980s
Jheri curl hairstyle worn in the 80s and 90s.
photo #108-yr-1980

     Fashions and Styles in 1994

  Popular Fashions:

    Women:
    The early 1990s saw a continuation of late 1980s fashion: women wore denim button down shirts, leggings, drainpipe jeans, colored tights, bike shorts, black leather jackets with shoulder pads, and skater dresses. Popular accessories included court shoes, cowboy boots, headscarves, leggings, slouch socks, Keds, ballet flats, and penny loafers. Leotards worn as tops with jeans were popular with young girls, teens, college girls, young women and women. A common outfit was to wear a skirt, dress shorts, babydoll or minidress with black opaque tights, white slouch socks and white sneakers especially Keds. Women's fashion in the mid 1990s became more feminine and form-fitting. Women tended to dress differently for each occasion. Both long and short skirts were favored, and loungewear generally consisted of leggings, large T-shirts, and baggy sweaters while at home or relaxing during the weekends.The most common look among young women was the short black slip dress worn over a tight, undersized white T-shirt. Among other fashion trends included lean pants, hot pants, black Lycra leggings, belted trench coats, and leather. Popular shoes and accessories during the mid-1990s included Wonderbra, Loafers, Mary Janes, suede sneakers, mules, clogs, knee high boots, jelly shoes, Go-go boots, black shoes, silver jewelry, dainty earrings and necklaces, conch shell necklaces,Slap bracelets, berets, straw hats, floppy hats, gold jewelry, and hipster belts. Navel piercings had started to gain popularity around this time.


    Men:
    Continuing on from the late 1980s, many young men wore tapered high waisted jeans with matching denim jackets, Stone Island or Ralph Lauren polo shirts with contrasting collars, short Harrington jackets, brightly colored windcheaters, Hush Puppies shoes, V neck sweaters, soccer shorts, pastel colored three button sportcoats, graphic print T shirts, tracksuit tops with a vertical contrasting stripe down the sleeve, sweatpants, shiny red or blue rayon monkey jackets, grey or tan leather jackets with shoulder pads, and wool baseball jackets with contrasting sleeves. Short shorts were popular in the early years of the decade, but were replaced with looser and baggier basketball shorts after 1993 when hip-hop fashion went mainstream. Hip-hop fashion went mainstream in 1995, with oversized baseball jackets, baggy jeans, bomber jackets, Baja Jackets, and tracksuits popular among young men as casual wear. Simultaneously, industrial and military styles crept into mainstream fashion, with machinery pieces becoming accessories. Baseball caps started being worn forwards again. Southern hip hop provided a platform for Fashion designers and musical artists to collaborate forming an influential subculture of anti fashion and alternative fashion designs, especially the popular recycled clothing worn by Arrested Development and Goodie Mob. Black leather reefer jackets and trenchcoats were also fashionable in the late 1990s.


    Hairstyles:
    The Jheri curl often spelled Jerry curl or Jeri Curl is a permed hairstyle that was common and popular among African American, Black Canadian, and Black British, especially during the 1980s and the 1990s. Invented by the hairdresser Jheri Redding, the Jheri curl gave the wearer a glossy, loosely curled look. It was touted as a "wash and wear" style that was easier to care for than the other popular chemical treatment of the day, the relaxer. For African-American men, the cornrows (popularized by former NBA player Allen Iverson) and buzz cut were a popular trend that continued into the early 2000s.



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pretty lady cooking
Hi there, I'm Annie.
Thanks for viewing my collection of wonderful soul-food dishes that my amazing ancestors cooked, and more than likely yours did too.

We didn't have much of anything back in the day and had to live off the scraps we were given. But like a famous rapper once said in his songs, we knew how to "make a dollar out of 15 cents" Enjoy.



sweet potatoes
Sweet Potatoes / Yams


Barbecue Ribs
Barbecue Ribs


Ham Hocks
Ham Hocks


Rice and Beans
Rice and Beans


Fish and Chips
Fish and Chips


Bean Soup
Bean Soup


Biscuits and Gravy
Biscuits and Gravy


Waffles
Waffles


Fried Chicken
Fried Chicken


Cornbread
Cornbread


Collard Greens
Collard Greens


Fried Liver
Fried Liver


Peach Preserves
Peach Preserves


Pinto Beans
Pinto Beans


Pound Cake
Pound Cake


Pork Chops
Pork Chops


Watermelon
Watermelon


black man hungry


(images - https://pixabay.com/)
Southern Cooking - Soul Food

    Have you ever wondered what African-Americans ate back in the day? Well, maybe we can help you with that. We've found the oldest known black cookbook to date.

    This cookbook was written by an actual former slave woman that had once lived on a plantation, but gained her freedom with the Emancipation Proclamation moving from Mobile, Alabama to San Francisco, California where she published an entirely excellent collection of 160 authentic and tasty recipes of the Old South entitled;

    "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking"

    This book is indeed a rare gemstone with tons of actual recipes that black folks enjoyed back in the day, but Mrs. Fisher cooking wasn't limited to blacks only, many whites also loved her delicious recipes and persuaded her to make a cookbook.

    Here is just a sample of some of the southern foods mentioned in her book, and by the way, it wasn't called soul-food until the 1960's.

    Breakfast
  • Maryland Beat Biscuit
  • Waffles
  • Cream Cake
  • Flannel Cakes
  • Sallie Lund
  • Egg Corn Bread
  • Plantation Corn Bread
  • Light Bread


  • Broiled Meats
  • Beefsteak
  • Lamb or Mutton Chops
  • Pork Steak or Chops
  • Venison


  • Croquettes
  • Lamb
  • Chicken
  • Crab
  • Liver
  • Oyster
  • Fish


  • Cakes Etc.
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Almond
  • Feather
  • Sponge
  • Fruit
  • Jelly
  • Carolas
  • Ginger Cookies
  • Sweet Wafers


  • Pickels, Sauces Etc.
  • Sweet Cucumber Pickles
  • Sweet Cucumber Mangoes
  • Chow Chow
  • Creole Chow Chow
  • Cherry Chutney
  • Game Sauce
  • Compound Tomato
  • Napoleon
  • Sweet Pickle Peaches
  • Sweet Pickle Prunes
  • Sweet Watermelon Kind Pickle
  • Sauce for Boiled Fish or Mutton
  • Milanese Sauce
  • Sauce for Suet Pudding


  • Pies, Etc.
  • Pastry for making Pies of all kinds
  • Preparing the Fruit for Pies
  • Rhubarb
  • Apple
  • Peach
  • Lemon Pies
  • Cocoanut
  • Cream Apple
  • Sweet Potato
  • Gooseberry and Cherry
  • Light Bread
  • Mince
  • Blackberry Roll
  • Oyster


  • Puddings
  • Snow
  • Plum
  • Corn
  • Corn Fritters
  • Batter
  • Rice
  • Yorkshire
  • Cheese
  • Suet


  • Preserves, Spices, ETC.
  • Brandy Peaches
  • Quince Preserves
  • Syrups for Preserves
  • Preserved Peaches
  • Preserved Pears
  • Currant Jelly
  • Cranberry Jelly
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Raspberry and Currant Jam Combined
  • Marmalade Peach
  • Crab Apple Jelly
  • Blackberry Brandy
  • Blackberry Syrup for Dysentery in Children
  • Preserved Apricots
  • Apple Sauce for Roast Pork
  • Charlotte Eusse
  • Spiced Currants
  • Preserved Cherries


  • Roast Meats
  • Venison
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Pig
  • Veal
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Birds
  • Quail
  • Domestic Duck
  • Wild Duck


  • Salads
  • Chicken
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Shrimp
  • Crab
  • Meat


  • Sherbets
  • Orange
  • Lemon
  • Pineapple


  • Soups, Chowders, Etc.
  • Beef
  • Ox-TaH
  • Calf 's Head
  • Mock Turtle
  • Green Turtle
  • Oyster Gumbo
  • Ochra Gumbo
  • Old Fashioned Turnip
  • Chicken
  • Corn and Tomato
  • Creole
  • Fish Chowder
  • Chicken Gumbo


  • Miscellaneous
  • Fricassed Chicken
  • Fried Chicken
  • Chicken fried Steak
  • Meat Stews or Entrees
  • Ice Cream
  • Boiled Turkey
  • Beef a la Mode
  • Neckbones
  • Spiced Round
  • Hog Maws
  • Stuffed Ham
  • Lima Beans
  • Jumberlie a Creole Dish
  • Baked Fish
  • Ribs, Beef or Pork
  • Boiled Corn
  • Peach Cobbler
  • Egg Plant Stuffed
  • Chitterlings or "Chitlins"
  • Corned Beef Hash
  • Ladies' Custard
  • Tonic Bitters
  • Terrapin Stew
  • Leaven Biscuit
  • Pap for infant Diet
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Cracklins
  • Meringue for Pudding
  • Circuit Hash


  • What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking
    Paperback – March, 1995
    by Abby Fisher (Author), Karen Hess (Editor)

    http://www.amazon.com/Fisher-Knows-About-Southern-Cooking/dp/1557094039

 

Southern Jewel Million Dollar Pound Cake
(this recipe is not from Mrs. Fisher cookbook, but has been in Annie's family for generations, it's everyones favorite!)

    Butter: 1 pound
    Sugar: 3 cups
    Eggs: 6
    Milk: 3/4 cup
    Cake Flour: 4 cups (Soft as Silk Cake Flour)
    Baking Powder: 1 teaspoon
    Vanilla Flavor: 1 teaspoon
    Lemon Flavor: 1 teaspoon

    Directions:
    For best results, leave butter and eggs out overnight
    Cream butter well, add sugar and mix until butter and sugar look like whip cream.
    Beat each egg individually and then add with sugar and butter, mix well for at least a couple minutes.
    Add milk and cake flour a little at a time, then add flavorings.
    Spray Pam spray on entire round cake pan, and then add cake batter.
    Bake about 1 hour and 15 minutes at 325.
    Let cake cool for about 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan.



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United States Census for Negroes
United States Census for African Americans
in the 1990s

O J Simpson
O J Simpson
photo #110-yr-1973

Percy Sledge
Percy Sledge
photo #100-yr-1994

Dorothy Irene Height
Dorothy Height
photo #108-yr-1957


Hear Kris Jenner Comment On O.J.'s Trial in 1994


Our Community in 1994
Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:

  • April 7, 1994 - Soul singer Percy Sledge pleads guilty to tax evasion.

  • March 5, 1994 - Singer Grace Slick was arrested for pointing a gun at a police officer.

  • Jan 13, 1994 - The world was captivated when Tonya Harding's bodyguard, Shawn Eric Eckardt & Derrick Brian Smith were arrested and charged with conspiracy to attack ice skater Nancy Kerrigan.

  • Nov 28, 1994 - Convicted serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer is clubbed to death by an inmate in the Columbia Correctional Institution gymnasium.

  • Dec 9, 1994 - United States Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders resigns after comments she made about masturbation.

  • 1994 Corey D. Flourney is elected president of the 400,000 member Future Farmers of America convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

  • 1994 - Dorothy Height wins Presidential Medal of Freedom.

  • June 12, 1994 - Football's O.J. Simpson's former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman are found stabbed to death. O.J. Simpson is the main suspect. O.J. and his friend Al Cowlings made history by the slow ride on the freeway that is seen on television by an estimated 95 million people.

  • 1990s - The United States Population is 248,709,878 with a total of 29,986,060 being African Americans.




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RESOURCES:


Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License


#100 -   Public Domain image -
By User:Carol M. Highsmith (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#101 -   Public Domain image -
By A1C Charles Beutler [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#102 -   Public Domain image -
By derivative work: Everyme (talk)O.J._Simpson_1990_·_DN-ST-91-03444.JPEG: Gerald Johnson (O.J._Simpson_1990_·_DN-ST-91-03444.JPEG) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103 -   Public Domain image -
https://pixabay.com/en/police-car-cops-car-usa-america-297720/
https://pixabay.com/en/suv-vehicle-suburban-drive-29064/
https://pixabay.com/en/flag-blow-wind-flutter-characters-75047/
https://pixabay.com/en/freeway-highway-street-road-297248/

#104 -   Public Domain image -
By Aladdin82 at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


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