blast from the past in 1981

blast from the past
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annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1981:
Muhammad Ali
    Muhammad Ali won the heavyweight title in 1964 from "The Bear" Sonny Liston. Not many people gave him much of a chance to win, but Ali had other ideas.

    In keeping with Ali's character on the day of the contract signing he drove a bus he had purchased to Liston's home in Denver, waking the champion (with the press in tow) at 3:00 a.m. shouting, "Come on out of there. I'm gonna whip you now." Liston had just moved into a white neighborhood and was furious at the attention this caused.

    Black folks loved it, but non-blacks hated him because of his brashness. He was a hero to many blacks when we really needed one, mainly for his confidence. He went on to defeat Liston in two heavyweight fights.

    Words alone cannot express how much this man meant to many in the black race. We were dejected, abused and frowned upon by every other race in America, but this person was a shining star who gave us hope that we also could achieve. He had so much confidence, that it rubbed off on us and we started believing in ourselves. He was every black person's hero. I'm gonna whup you sucka!

    Many people both blalck and white began to realize that Ali never really hated any of the fighters he fought, but it was a show to keep us entertained and make his and his opponents payday a bigger one.

    In his career, Ali received just about every award a person could win, mingled with top name entertainers and met every president of the United States. His name and goodwill is known and admired all over the earth. His decline came around 1980 when he fought against Larry Holmes, who didn't want to fight him, but fought anyway with Holmes badly beating the hero.

    A really sad sight to witness, it was the end of an remarkable era. Despite pleas to retire, Ali fought one last time on December 11, 1981 against Trevor Berbick, losing a ten-round decision.

    Ali finally decided to permanently hang up his gloves in 1981 and this is why we chose this year to bestow the 1981 Hamite Award to a great human who is known all over this earth. The true entertainer who put on the ultimate show. Ali always thrilled and never let down his adoring public.

annual hamite award
Muhammad Ali
photo#102




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How were blacks feeling in 1981?
happy mood of blacks

welcome to the 80s



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african american first

 For the year 1981:
  • Isabel Sanford was the first African-American actress to win a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.



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Double Dutch
Double Dutch is a rope skipping exercise played when two ropes are turned in eggbeater fashion.
While the ropes are turned, a third person jumps within. Early Dutch immigrants introduced
it to America, and it later became a favorite game for black American girls to play.
  (click here)
photo #108-yr-1981


blacks and boxing

Garry Lee Maddox
Garry Lee Maddox
photo #104-yr-1949

 Rube Foster
Andrew "Rube" Foster
photo #106-yr-1879

Frank Robinson
Frank Robinson
photo #107-yr-1935

Jesse Owens
Jesse Owens
photo #106-yr-1936

Bob Gibson
Bob Gibson
photo #110-yr-1935

     Sports in 1981
  • Garry Maddox aka (Secretary of Defense) wins the 1981 National League Gold Gloves.

  • Rube Foster was an African American baseball player, manager, and pioneer executive in the Negro leagues. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981.

  • In addition to being the first black manager in the major leagues with the American League's Indians, upon joining the Giants, Frank Robinson also became the first black manager in the National League.

  • 1981 - USA Track and Field created the Jesse Owens Award in 1981, which is given annually to the country's top track and field athlete.

  • January 15, 1981 - Baseball's Bob Gibson was elected to the Baseball's Hall of Fame.

  • January 15, 1981 - Former Heavyweight champion Leon Spinks was attacked and awakened hours later in a motel to find he had been robbed of $45,000 worth of clothes, jewelry and his gold dental plate was among the items taken.

  • January 19, 1981 - Boxer Muhammad Ali saves a a young man with psychiatric problems from committing suicide.

  • April 11, 1981 - Boxer Larry Holmes defeats Trevor Berbick in 15 for the heavyweight boxing title. Trivia:  Holmes and Berbick really hated each other. Berbick had a well-publicized feud with Larry Holmes. Their feud culminated in a public confrontation and brawl in 1991, which was caught on tape. After a verbal altercation indoors, Berbick was outside complaining about being kicked and punched by Larry Holmes when Holmes climbed atop a parked car and launched himself at Berbick. The footage ends as the two are separated by police and others.

  • April 25, 1981 - Seattle Mariners resourceful manager Maury Wills tries to pull a fast one. Trivia:  Wills ordered the Mariners' grounds crew to make the batter's boxes one foot longer than regulation. The extra foot was in the direction of the mound. However, Oakland Athletics manager Billy Martin noticed something was wrong and asked the plate umpire to investigate. Under questioning from Kunkel, the Mariners' head groundskeeper admitted Wills had ordered the change. Wills claimed he was trying to help his players stay in the box. However, Martin suspected that given the large number of breaking-ball pitchers on the A's staff, Wills wanted to give his players an advantage. The American League suspended Wills for two games and fined him $500.

  • June 12, 1981 - Boxer Larry Holmes knocks out Leon Spinks in the 3rd round for the WBC heavyweight boxing title.

  • October 3, 1981 - Boxer Mike Weaver defeats Quick Tillis in the 15th round for the heavyweight boxing title.



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WAR ON BLACKS, OR ALSO KNOWN AS WAR ON DRUGS

Mass Incarceration


law and order
Convicts Leased to Harvest Timber, around 1915, Florida
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Convicts_Leased_to_Harvest_Timber.png
(public domain image)


    The more things change, the more they stay the same


Shortly after slavery, blacks were thrown into prison for petty and minor offenses which resulted in long sentences. It was big business for the penitentiary because they would hire these convicts out for various jobs and keep blacks off the streets at the same time. They killed two birds with one stone.


It was a form of bondage that did not last a lifetime and did not automatically extend from one generation to the next. But it was nonetheless slavery – a system in which armies of free men, guilty of no crimes and entitled by law to freedom, were compelled to labor without compensation, were repeatedly bought and sold, and were forced to do the bidding of white masters through the regular application of extraordinary physical coercion.


This form of slavery was abolished by President Franklin D. Roosevelt December 12, 1941.


Is the criminal justise system much different today?


President Richard Nixon started the modern day Law and Order campaign of the War on Drugs. President Ronald Reagan would continue with the program in his administration and later President Bill Clinton during his term created tough mandatory sentencing that unfairly affected blacks.

Crack cocaine was associated with poor blacks because it was a cheap drug and in contrast with powder cocaine which was considered a white man's drug because it was more expensive. Neither drug was more deadly than the other but crack was demonized because it was associated with black people.

While a person found with five grams of crack cocaine faced a five-year mandatory minimum prison sentence, a person holding powder cocaine could receive the same sentence only if he or she held five hundred grams. Similarly, those carrying ten grams of crack cocaine faced a ten-year mandatory sentence, while possession of one thousand grams of powder cocaine was required for the same sentence to be imposed.

Don't get it wrong, these were very well ORGANIZED methods from anti-Americans in control of our country to hold blacks down and is very well documented. It seems these anti-Americans are always reinventing themselves in ways of oppressing black citizens. Perhaps they should show some love for a change instead of acting on their imagined fear.


WHO IS THIS MAN?


John Ehrlichman


John Ehrlichman who was counsel to President Richard Nixon and would later become a criminal himself with his involvement in the watergate scandal made the following comment about the reason for Nixon's war on drugs:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”



Check these statistics out

One of every three black American males born today can expect to go to prison in his lifetime. While black defendants account for roughly 80% of those arrested for crack-related offenses, public health data has found that two-thirds of crack cocaine users are white or Hispanic. The leading cause of incarceration of an African American male is a non-violent drug offense. Most black men in prisons are not monsters but just got caught up in the system for a non-violent mistake they may have made.

These stats are for the years 1970 - 2010



1 in every 106 White males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 36 Hispanic males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 15 Black males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order


    We have to help our own black boys because nobody else cares. Wouldn't it be nice if today's blacks possessed the same gumption our African American ancestors had by taking control of our own destiny as a race of people? It seems ever since the end of slavery we are constantly pointing out to the white man how unfair and unjust he has treated us. Don't you think he knows that? What do we expect them to do, start crying and say I'm sorry and start treating us like fellow Americans by sharing freely? Don't hold your breath.


    At this point in history, it's clear we must begin to work on ourselves more than anything else. We've probably gone just about as far as we can go with the protesting/marching strategy which was an excellent choice over the decades, but now it's time for action on our part. MLK would have likely said the same thing.


    A very unpopular message for many blacks who live with the self-pity attitude but the only avenue available for American success. Can you imagine how much it would lift our race if every single black boy possessed a college degree? It's a dream that could become a reality if we really believed it.


    Education plays the major role in American success for blacks and any group of blacks in a position of authority such as sports figures, entertainers, singers, etc that teaches the opposite by their examples we should run away from them as fast as possible. Sadly, these groups are the ones that many blacks look up to for guidance instead of our black educators.


    When one of us climbs the very difficult and racist ladder of success in the American power structure by using our God-given brain power we will not forget about those we left behind, but instead will help other blacks do the same by extending a hand until we find ourselves in a position of directing instead of always asking and begging.


    Our ancestors knew we could do it and we have to believe it too. We are from some of the strongest and finest stock that is known to mankind and should set the example for all dark skinned people over the entire earth simply because we are in a position to do so and live in the greatest country in the world. Our story is one of the greatest ever told. We are AmazingBlacks.



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HOW LONG WILL GOOD WHITE-AMERICANS
SIT ON THE FENCE?




whites sitting on fence


Since the beginning of American history, there's always been a fight between good and bad. The problem is that both good and bad forces claim to adore democracy. Someone is lying. You be the judge.


First, we need to define democracy and we'll let two of America's greatest Presidents do this for us by their actions and famous quotes.


Abraham Lincoln made the following quotes:

"As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this to the extent of the difference, is no democracy."

"I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races.... But I hold that ... there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence, the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."


Now it's very clear from the many biased comments Abraham Lincoln made against black people he wasn't the type that would have blacks over for dinner, in fact, most whites shared his views many years ago. But that's okay, at least he was honest. This site believes he would have changed his racist views if living in our time because one of his most admirable qualities was flexibility.


In contrast to Abraham Lincoln, the first President of the United States, George Washington didn't share Lincoln's view of democracy.


Black slaves were actively sought and recruited to fight for America in the Revolutionary War and promised citizenship after the victory. It's well recorded that slaves fought with courage and valor that ensured American success. George Washington himself made the comment:

Washington wrote a letter to Colonel Henry Lee III stating that success in the war would come to whatever side could arm the blacks the fastest.


whites sitting on fence

But after victory in the war, America didn't keep it promises, and most blacks were forced back into slavery. Of course, George Washington had to know about this but did nothing. Washington was a brilliant soldier but failed as an upholder of truth and justice and set the tone for future race relations in our country by trivializing and compromising real Democracy.


Washington had many slaves himself and didn't want to free them and damage his financial stake. He put money interests ahead of real Democracy. But all of America's founders didn't feel this way. A contemporary of Washington and future President John Adams hated slavery and was proud to boast he handled his business with paid workers. Did George Washington look at himself in the mirror and feel guilty about compromising (true) American Democracy? History says he didn't.


Washington created the blueprint for this distorted view of true Democracy


Blacks in the colonies had been treated poorly since their arrival from Africa, but this action by Washington made it official. This blueprint became the norm in much of America's dealings with black people. Whites felt if their supreme leader thought so lowly of black people, they would also.


We must all be honest with ourselves in admitting this view of Democracy was not American because it denied certain humans liberty, justice and the pursuit of happiness. Therefore we must call for what it was, which is Anti-American.


So we had two different Presidents with various versions of Democracy, and this is the way it remains today. What made Lincoln a force for good and better President was he put Democracy first and his personal prejudices second, but Washington put his financial interest ahead of true Democracy. This is what set these two men apart. Both were great men with different views about what it meant to be an American on the side of liberty and justice for all.


After Lincoln's death, democracy would take a downward spiral. One of the most biased President in American history led the attack. His name was Andrew Johnson, and he fought against the Civil Rights of blacks tooth and nail. Every favorable bill for former slaves that appeared on his desk was immediately denied. Later, there were new laws created to restrict black American citizens that worked very well. This was called the Jim Crow era. It was an all-out attack on Democracy by Anti-Americans and aided by good white Americans who remained on the fence. Read for yourself.


There's not enough room on this web page to describe the hate and exclusion by government and white Americans against blacks during this period. Jim Crow laws touched every part of life, all across America. Blacks and whites were kept apart as much as possible. Good jobs went to whites; blacks were given the worst with less pay. Many industries wouldn’t hire blacks. Many unions passed special rules to exclude them. All juries and judges were white; blacks were illegally denied voting rights. No blacks allowed in public pools. Many restaurants would not serve blacks, and those that did had a dirty colored section. Blacks and whites went to county fairs on different days. Blacks couldn't use public libraries. Simple common courtesy was rarely shown the blacks. Whites beat, tortured, raped and killed blacks with no fear of punishment. Blacks were denied credit for businesses, housing, cars by the banks. Blacks were kept out of white neighborhoods with housing covenants. Oklahoma had black and white phone booths. Texas had cities where blacks were entirely restricted from living. Blacks could not leave their homes after 10:00 pm in Mobile Alabama. Blacks could not marry whites. Georgia had separate white and black parks. Prisons, hospitals, and orphanages were segregated as were schools and colleges. Blacks and whites had to use separate sets of books in school, in Florida, they couldn't be stored together. When a person was sworn in at a trial, the whites used one Bible, and the blacks had a separate Bible. For those who did complete college, a crucial question had to be answered. Who was going to be their clients? Whites didn't engage blacks in business, and the battered Negro couldn't afford their services. These laws became so entrenched in American life; even unwritten laws affected black citizenship; blacks understood to stay out of white stores and establishments. Segregation was so complete that whites did not see blacks except when being served by them. After the Civil Rights movement of the 60s, blacks have made enormous gains. This is how the United States of America became a polarized country. Each and every President knew what was going on and allowed this illegal activity for 87 years. Were they guilty of not upholding the United States Constitution in the Negroes behalf? Is this the reason why many other nations laugh at America with its constant claims of being on the side of good and high morality?



Did religion made things worse?


Even though the U.S. was not founded as a Christian nation and existed solely as a secular state completely free of religious influence in lawmaking, religion would soon be thrown into the loop. This made American people feel righteous and just in their own eyes. White's beleived they were "good" and made in God's image and blacks were not. In time slogans such as "In God We Trust" were printed on money to describe a people who had snuffed out Democracy, They felt God was on their side and loved only them.


Countless movies, radio shows, newspapers, magazines and other media would consistently portray these Anti-Americans as on the side of good, morally upstanding and righteous to the world with God on their side. Good white Americans had to know this was a farce because of the way it's black citizens were being treated and did nothing.


There were a relative few brave, good white Americans who spoke up during this period and got involved with some even losing their lives, but the majority did nothing. They remained on the fence because they were also partakers of the privileged American way of living and failed to realize how this was undermining true Democracy with the threat of one day being faced with an America they wouldn't recognize.


whites sitting on fence


“Ignorance of how we are shaped racially is the first sign of privilege. In other words. It is a privilege to ignore the consequences of race in America.” Tim Wise


So, what now?


Because of the folly of racism and privilege by Anti-Americans and the lack of action to speak out for true Democracy by good Americans, has our country morphed into another form of power? Something that is completely different than it started out as, perhaps like an insatiable, detestable and ugly monster, without a soul or conscience? You be the judge.


whites sitting on fence





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blacks moving into neighborhood



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ballot box

President Ronald Reagan
President Ronald Reagan
photo #104-yr-1981

Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
photo #110-yr-1976

Black Liberation Army


      Political Scene in 1981
  • 1981 - Ronald Reagan was an American politician, commentator, and actor, who served as the 40th President of the United States from 1981 to 1989. Prior to his presidency, he served as the 33rd Governor of California from 1967 to 1975, following a career as an actor and union leader in Hollywood.

  • 1981 - Jimmy Carter an American politician, author, and member of the Democratic Party who served as the 39th President of the United States from 1977 to 1981. He was awarded the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with the Carter Center.

  • 1981 - The Black Liberation Army was an underground, black nationalist militant organization that operated in the United States from 1970 to 1981. Composed largely of former Black Panthers (BPP), the organization's program was one of "armed struggle" against the oppression and tyranny of the U.S. Government, and its stated goal was to "take up arms for the liberation and self-determination of black people in the United States." The BLA carried out a series of bombings, murders, robberies (which participants termed "expropriations"), and prison breaks.



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THE CIVIL RIGHTS BATTLE HAS BEEN WON!

We are extremely happy and excited for the future!
There are smaller battles ahead, but we will prevail.
It was a horrific journey.
We thought after slavery was outlawed in 1863, everything would be okay.
But instead, it was a big disappointment the next hundred years for blacks.



Since emancipation blacks have been murdered by lynch mobs, tortured, raped, assaulted, disrespected, demoralized, discouraged and made to feel less than human, and a search of history would reveal blacks seldom retaliated but always longed for peace and justice. But after the victorious civil rights battle, many are in terrible shape mentally, but we will keep on pushing. We've come too far to quit now.

cool black americans photo#104-yr-2015


Most white Americans along with our United States government actively participated in atrocities that bordered on genocide against blacks either by their silence or direct involvement, but there were also many good white American brothers who understood the true meaning of democracy for all.

We couldn't have been victorious without them. Our Civil Rights leaders have been excellent moral examples for us since freedom from slavery. It was a collective effort. They unselfishly lead blacks and did an outstanding job.

They were the only hope of a race of people without a voice in a privileged white society who had kidnapped our U.S. Constitution to their own selfish advantage.

We would like to take this opportunity to give recognition to ones who have helped our American struggle. This is not a complete listing by any means. There were many more shining examples of Americans, both black and white.

But now since we are victorious with our Civil Rights and ready to travel the next phase of our journey, we need strong black leaders who will teach us the critical importance of education. So an important question needs to be answered.

We need to know...
who speaks for the negro

Our fearless Civil Rights leaders have victoriously completed their task and have proudly passed the baton to all African American Mothers and Fathers to continue the struggle by raising our children with high moral standards encouraging them to achieve and soar like the eagles.

who speaks for the negro
The new black leaders of our community,
Aren't they beautiful?
They would make our ancestors very proud!
I think I feel a tear coming




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racism

A man lynched from a tree
A man lynched from a tree. Face partially concealed by angle and headgear.
photo #109-yr-1906

      Race in 1981
  • September 28, 1981 - avowed racist Joseph Paul Franklin was sentenced to life imprisonment for killing two black joggers, Ted Fields and David Martin in Salt Lake City, Utah.



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america' last chance
america' last chance


Liberty, Justice and Freedom For All

It's true at one time in history; America was intended solely for white people, but not all white people. Most of America's founders desired only the fittest and smartest whites to settle here. The Irish, Italians and many more ethnic groups were considered low-life and not worthy to intermingle with the self-proclaimed superior whites, in fact, they were treated as harshly as the black slaves.


But within time they changed their views and allowed lower class whites to have an equal say in the building of America, and of course being similar in color made it easy for these different classes to blend in with one another, and in time you couldn't tell the difference. A luxury that was impossible for blacks to attain.


But on the other hand, Black slaves were considered savage beast without the capabilities to learn and contribute to America, other than with their back-breaking labor.


Why did whites feel this way abouts blacks?


Before their arrival to America as slaves, they were very far behind in development and worldly intelligence. There were great African Kingdoms, but they were no match for the ruthless Europeans. African rulers failed to educate their citizens which would have been a huge undertaking because there were thousands upon thousands of different tribes and clans with their distinct language and customs.


Most Africans didn't know how to read and write and would pass their history down from generation to the next orally. They also believed profoundly in superstition and all sorts of foolish beliefs that didn't help them once the Europeans arrived allowing them to ravage and dominate the African populations completely. Whites were very competitive and chose to proclaim themselves superior to the blacks, instead of sharing their knowledge to help these uneducated Africans.


So from the beginning, the Europeans made this a race issue. Africans were so far behind in human development, whites thought very lowly of them, and since they didn't have examples and scientific techniques we have today to prove otherwise they did as they pleased with little protest from the majority of the white population. In fact, most whites believed blacks were half human/beast only because they didn't know any better.


But in time things would change and there would become many free blacks and also blacks in slavery who would achieve against all the odds of racism. Many whites began to realize that blacks were human beings and if given a chance could be just as intelligent as white people. The movement was started to get blacks equality in America to the dismay of hardcore white supremacist who refused to accept this undeniable evidence that all men are equal in ability.


Scientific discoveries would later determine there was no genetic proof that blacks were inferior to other races which would utterly destroy the superior white theory that had been preached for centuries. All that blacks needed was an education and an opportunity to compete and could do just as well as other races.


Although African-Americans were not immigrants but brought here as slaves, they had things in common because they also yearned for liberty, justice, and freedom. In time what made America so great was it realized it was wrong and attempted to change it's view so it could live up to the true meaning of liberty and justice for all.


But this wouldn't be easy because of many white people who refused to change their views and progress to a new era of love and cooperation for all humanity. They choose to live in the past where they enjoyed a comfortable, privileged life without blacks in the loop.


america' last chance


Since the races were compared to an inferior versus superior issue, many centuries ago white superior beliefs may have been a reasonable belief, with the Africans so far behind in human development and Europeans much more advanced. But with the successes of countless black Americans and other dark-skinned people around the world today, racism and hate have become an archaic, unreasonable and ignorant belief.


Is America at the crossroad?

Well if so, it had to happen one day. For generation after generation, whites have either consciously or unconsciously enjoyed special privilege in America. They control the purse strings not only in America but around the world in dictating a perverted version of justice and liberty for all. Other groups at home and abroad are growing weary and are fighting back.


Now the questions become, what will America do next? Will she attempt in becoming a true America of tolerance, justice and liberty for all people or retreat to her lily white past where there is undoubtedly much danger awaiting for all who reside in her? Britain must answer the same questions.


america' last chance


Simply put, for people who say they love America but hate certain ethnic groups who reside in her are lying to themselves. Their hatred is not based on anything factual. They hate America. They're not true Americans and completely fail to understand the real meaning of her and seek to destroy the last great empire in world history with their foolish hate.


america' last chance






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African American culture going downhill

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black Movies in America

Isabel Sanford
Isabel Sanford with The Jeffersons co-stars, Sherman Hemsley and Mike Evans
photo #105-yr-1917

Lena  Horne
Lena Horne
photo #102-yr-1917

Broadway / Television / Movies in 1981

    Broadway:
  • March 1, 1981 - Sophisticated Ladies is a musical revue based on the music of Duke Ellington. The musicalopened on Broadway at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre after 767 performances and fifteen previews.

  • May 12, 1981 - The Broadway production of "Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music" opens at Nederlander NYC and is met with an overwhelmingly positive critical response.



  • Movies:
  • Bustin' Loose - starring Richard Pryor as an ex-con who gets a second chance after violating his probation.



  • Television:
  • The Jeffersons - is an black sitcom that was broadcast on CBS from January 18, 1975, through July 2, 1985. The show focuses on George and (weezy) Louise Jefferson, an affluent African-American couple living in New York City. Proud George loved his family, little man carried a big stick and wasn't afraid of anybody. Movin on Up!



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famous african american birthdays


Serena  Williams
Serena Williams
photo #101

Alicia Keys
Alicia Keys
photo #100-yr-2002

Trenesha Biggers
Trenesha Biggers
photo #103-yr-1981

Jennifer Hudson
Jennifer Hudson
photo #103-yr-2006

     Famous Birthdays in 1981
  • January 5, 1981 - Brooklyn Sudano  an American actress, singer and dancer.

  • January 6, 1981 - Mike Jones  an American rapper, actor, and entrepreneur.

  • January 17, 1981 - Ray J  an American singer, songwriter, record producer and actor.

  • January 23, 1981 - Julia Jones  an American actress.

  • January 25, 1981 - Alicia Keys  an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and actress.

  • February 11, 1981 - Kelly Rowland  an American singer, songwriter, actress and television personality.

  • March 11, 1981 - LeToya Luckett  known professionally as LeToya, is an American singer-songwriter and actress.

  • March 13, 1981 - Toccara Jones  an American Hip hop model, television personality, fashion model, occasional actress and singer.

  • March 15, 1981 - Young Buck an American rapper, actor, entrepreneur and producer.

  • March 16, 1981 - Curtis Granderson, Jr. an American professional baseball outfielder.

  • April 19, 1981 - Brandon Fobbs  an American actor.

  • April 30, 1981 - Rose Rollins  an American actress and model.

  • May 2, 1981 - Nicole Monique Wray an American R&B and hip hop singer.

  • May 3, 1981 - Farrah Franklin an American singer and actress.

  • May 24, 1981 - Jerod Mixon   an American actor.

  • May 26, 1981 - Ty Hodges   an American television and film actor, singer and rapper.

  • June 8, 1981 - Redaric Williams an American actor, model, author and musician.

  • July 8, 1981 - Lance Darnell Gross  an American actor and photographer.

  • July 15, 1981 - Reginald Damascus Abercrombie former Major League Baseball outfielder.

  • August 4, 1981 - Meghan Markle   an American fashion model, spokesmodel, and actress.

  • August 5, 1981 - Carl Demonte Crawford nicknamed "The Perfect Storm", an American professional baseball outfielder.

  • August 5, 1981 - Jesse Wesley Williams an American actor, model, and activist.

  • August 8, 1981 - Meagan Monique Good an American film and television actress and occasional film producer.

  • August 24, 1981 - Mercedes Yvette  an American fashion model and actress.

  • August 27, 1981 - Karla Cheatham Mosley  an American actress.

  • September 4, 1981 - Beyoncé is an African-American singer and actress who rose to fame in the late 1990s as lead singer of R&B girl-group Destiny's Child.

  • September 12, 1981 - Jennifer Hudson  an American recording artist, actress and spokesperson.

  • September 18, 1981 - Tanisha Mariko Harper a model, actress and television host.

  • September 21, 1981 - Jerrika Delayne Hinton an American actress.

  • September 26, 1981 - Serena Williams is an African-American professional tennis player.

  • October 15, 1981 - Keyshia Cole  an American singer, songwriter, record producer, businesswoman and television personality.

  • October 23, 1981 - Jackie Long  an American television and film actor, writer, musician, director and producer.

  • October 23, 1981 - Louis Benjamin Francisco an American professional baseball outfielder.

  • November 22, 1981 - Shangela Laquifa Wadley an African American drag queen, comedian, and reality television personality.

  • December 9, 1981 - Camoflauge was a U.S. rapper from Hitch Village housing project in Savannah, Georgia.

  • December 25, 1981 - Trenesha Biggers an American model and professional wrestler who worked for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling as a TNA Knockout under the ring name Rhaka Khan.

  • 1981 - Chaunté Wayans  an American actress, comedian, writer and editor.

  • 1981 - Nzinga Christine Blake an American / Sierra Leonean actress.

  • 1981 - Uzoamaka Nwaneka "Uzo" Aduba an American actress.



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black american deaths

Joe Louis
Joe Louis
photo #107-yr-1914

Roy Brown
Roy Brown
photo #110-yr-1950

Edith Wilson
Edith Wilson
photo #114-yr-1896

     Famous Deaths in 1981
  • January 8, 1981 - Matthew Beard, Jr. was an American child actor, most famous for portraying the character of Stymie in the Our Gang short films from 1930 to 1935.

  • January 1981 - Lawerence Neal was a scholar of African-American theatre. He is well known for his contributions to the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

  • March 30, 1896 - Edith Wilson was an American blues singer and vaudeville performer.

  • April 12, 1981 - Joe Louis  was an American professional boxer and the World Heavyweight Champion from 1937 to 1949. He is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time.

  • May 25, 1981 - Roy Brownwas an American R&B singer, songwriter and musician, who had a significant influence on the early development of rock and roll.

  • October 2, 1981 - Hazel Dorothy Scott was an internationally known, American jazz and classical pianist and singer.

  • December 13, 1981 - Dewey "Pigmeat" Markham was an African American entertainer. Though best known as a comedian, Markham was also a singer, dancer, and actor. His nickname came from a stage routine, in which he declared himself to be "Sweet Poppa Pigmeat".



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IF NOT, WHY SO DIFFICULT TO FIND FOR MANY?


National issues have always been compounded for black males and females in America. The feminist movement of the 70s ushered in a division between men and women relationships both black and white. It taught the woman to be self-reliant, strong and independent from the male, and we must all admit she has down an outstanding job.

black relationships
photo#117-yr-2015


But in regards to relationships, black women had another issue to add to this because the black male in America has historically been a target of hate and fear and will probably continue to be so. After the 60s, the face of racism and exclusion changed its ugly image from overt to covert for the most part which can be just as damaging.

Let's be totally honest. Black men are simply not well liked or spoken of kindly in America. Just about every article we read in the papers or internet is something negative when editors just as easily could have chosen a positive story of black male kindness. People tolerate black men, but don't want any part of us, or to get to know us as human beings or fellow Americans.

After slavery whites instituted illegal laws that were 100% against our Constitution which enabled them to build an enormous and exclusive white power structure that still stands today.

Even today many black men are intimidated by this power structure and refuse to challenge it in an intelligent way, like picking up a book and using their God-given brain power. This is why our distant ancestors in Africa who come to America as immigrants to enroll in American colleges don't want anything to do with black Americans.

They think we're foolish for wasting this incredible opportunity in gaining success. They know it's not because black American males can't do it, it's because we don't want to do it. To prove this point, Google "African immigrants in college" and discover that African/Asian immigrants out-perform all races academically in higher learning.


No one would deny that African-Americans and Africans are from the same stock of humanity. So why is it black immigrants can achieve on such a high level in America and we don't?


It's because we start out the gate with a disadvantage created by this humongous power structure against us and even more sad is our own people, AKA black role models who sell their damaging and harmful products which teaches our young males an entirely different approach to American success while they pad their already fat pocketbooks.

These people fail to uplift our race and are always portraying negative images and imply that something is owed to us and we should feel sorry for ourselves, so why even try? What they rap/sing/act about doesn't include books and education but glorifies a life of having fun each and every day. For the most part, good black parents struggle to compete with these very powerful enemies and lose their sons to the streets.

Before the movement, there were more blacks who were married than whites. But that would later change. When the opportunity presented itself, these aggressive and amazing black women took off to achieve and soar like the eagles, leaving the intimidated black male in the dust with his foolish boy-like games. Many black women would go on to raise families without the intimidated and targeted black man in the children's life.

No one better than her understood what the black male was going through facing everyday life, and she would have supported him if he would have put up some intelligent fight, but many struggling black men didn't and chose a foolish life of running game, and backwards living that's opposite of what it takes for American success.

In today's world, black women probably encounter these same struggling black men much more than the successful ones in their quest for love, but judge them as all the same.

Many extraordinary black men have figured out the white power structure game and became successful at it, and continues to do so. There are tons of black fellas who are intelligent, honorable, stable, gainfully employed, and faithful who just desires a smart, sexy, girly black woman who understands how to relax in her femininity and allow the man to rest in his masculinity for the well-being of the relationship.

These extraordinary single black men sincerely wonder if they stand an ounce of a chance with the characteristic traits of a typical Black American woman.

Who are today's black women? We all know they are amazing human beings to accomplish what they have, but have they out-smarted themselves in regards to male-female relationships?

black men love black women

How would you answer?

Letisha is a 30-year-old college educated black woman who has worked hard as a lawyer to achieve the lifestyle she adores which includes a lovely home, luxury cars, plenty of cash in the bank and much food in the refrigerator. In a good year, Letisha will make $150,000. Letisha doesn't want for anything except for meeting a nice man, falling in love and getting married.

Lamont is a blue collar worker earning just enough to get by. He is self-taught in everything he does and is quite smart. He owns a junk yard that was left to him by his long-deceased dad, Fred. Lamont prefers his profession to be recognized as dealing in commodities. He loves his work. He just doesn't make much money from it. In a good year, Lamont will make $35,000.

Letisha decides to treat herself to a month long vacation in Hawaii staying at the best hotel. Lamont who plays the lottery every week finally hit a little jackpot decided to do the same. Fate would have these two young black people meeting and discovering an instant attraction and love connection, and happy they have a whole month to nurture it along.

Lamont and Letisha are inseparable the entire vacation. Letisha explains to Lamont that she's a lawyer and Lamont explains to her he's a dealer in commodities. They are so connected; they never run out of words to say, and even finish each other's sentences. Well, needless to say, they eventually make mad passionate love with Letisha shedding one tear which was always her gauge of a real lover.

Letisha and Lamont were very excited about what the future held for them. Possible marriage was even discussed. On the last day of vacation, they exchanged addresses. Letisha was so excited she expressed to Lamont she couldn't wait to visit him. Two weeks later and upon arriving at Lamont's junkyard business she couldn't believe the huge sign that read "Top Commodities Dealer, Lamont." Letisha made a quick u-turn and never called Lamont again. Lamont felt hurt and wondered if another type of woman would have stayed.

Which woman do you more associate with?

(1) The woman that stayed and continued with her relationship with Lamont is a level headed woman and hasn't let money cloud her view of real life and potential happiness with an otherwise good black man who had proven to stimulate both her mind and body.

(2) The woman that made the quick u-turn is the frustrated one, and always complaining about there not being any good black men because she equates money with happiness, when quite the contrary joy and love is very straightforward and easy. Being unreasonable she makes everything difficult.

Analysis:  Independent black women have accomplished so much since the Civil Rights movement of the 60s, and have our wonderful African American ancestors to thank for the opportunity. Money should only be used as a tool for the benefit of the relationship between a man and woman not a gauge of another person's character or worth. Real men for decades found pride in bringing home the bacon to their wives who didn't work and those relationships worked just fine, only because money was not the primary factor, love and respect was.



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famous african american weddings

George Foreman
George Foreman
photo #111-yr-1973

Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
photo #114-yr-1973

     Famous Weddings in 1981
  • February 14, 1981 - Opal Stone  and Ron Perlman are married.

  • February 14, 1981 - Denise Nicholas and Jim Hill are married.

  • April 12, 1981 - Gregory Hines and Pamela Koslow are married.

  • September 15, 1981 - George Foreman and Sharon Goodson are married.

  • 1981 - Richard Pryor  and Jennifer Lee are married.

  • 1981 - Clifton Davis and Ann Taylor are married.

  • 1981 - Lawrence Taylor and Deborah Belinda Taylor are married.

  • 1981 - Ike Turner and Margaret Thomas are married.

  • 1981 - Warren Moon and Felicia Fontenot are married.

  • 1981 - Ed Bradley and Priscilla Coolidge are married.

  • 1981 - Gerald Albright and Glynis Albright are married.

  • 1981 - August Wilson and Judy Oliver are married.

  • 1981 - Tony Gwynn and Alicia Gwynn are married.



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famous african american divorces

Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
photo #102-yr-1928

James Brown
James Brown
photo #103-yr-1933

     Famous Divorces in 1981
  • January 10, 1981 - James Brown  and Deidre Jenkins were divorced.

  • February 1981 - Marvin Gaye  and Janis Hunter were divorced.

  • September 11, 1981 - Redd Foxx  and Korean-American Yun Chi Chung were divorced.

  • 1981 - Maya Angelou and Paul Du Feu were divorced.

  • 1981 - Mary Wilson  and Pedro Ferrer were divorced.



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Gladys Knight and the Pips perform aboard the aircraft carrier USS RANGER (CV-61).
Left to right: William "Red" Guest, Edward Patten, Merald "Bubba" Knight, and Gladys Knight. (1981)

photo #108-yr-1967

soul train
Soul Train ran from 1971-2006
photo #109-yr-1971

Roy Brown
Roy Brown
photo #110-yr-1950

Diana Ross
Diana Ross
photo #106-yr-1981

Rick James
Rick James
photo #107-yr-1981

Chuck Berry
Chuck Berry
photo #101-yr-1926

Michael Jackson
Michael Jackson
photo #101-yr-1958

     Music in 1981

  Billboard Top Soul Hits:
  • Celebration - Kool and the Gang

  • Fantastic Voyage - Lakeside

  • Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me) - Gap Band

  • Don't Stop the Music - Yarbrough & Peoples

  • Being with You - Smokey Robinson

  • Sukiyaki - A Taste of Honey

  • A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do) - Ray Parker Jr. & Raydio

  • What Cha' Gonna Do for Me - Chaka Khan

  • Give It to Me Baby - Rick James

  • Double Dutch Bus - Frankie Smith

  • I'm in Love - Evelyn King

  • Endless Love - Diana Ross & Lionel Richie

  • When She Was My Girl - The Four Tops

  • Never Too Much - Luther Vandross

  • I Heard It Through the Grapevine (Part 1) - Roger Troutman

  • Take My Heart (You Can Have It If You Want It) - Kool and the Gang

  • Let's Groove - Earth, Wind and Fire




  Popular Soul Dances:
  • Break-dancing

  • The Macarena

  • The Robot

  • The Electric Slide

  • The MC Hammer

  • The Worm

  • Hip Hop

  • Moonwalk

  • Voguing

  • Crip Walk

  • Cabbage patch

  • Running Man

  • Chicago stepping

  • KC Two-Step

  • Detroit Ballroom




 Blues Hall of Fame:
  • Bobby "Blue" Bland
  • Roy Brown
  • Blind Willie McTell
  • Professor Longhair
  • Tampa Red


  MTV in 1981:
  • Breaking the "color barrier" (1981–1983)
    During MTV's first few years on the air, very few black artists were included in rotation on the channel. The select few who were in MTV's rotation were Michael Jackson, Prince, Eddy Grant, Donna Summer, Musical Youth, and Herbie Hancock. MTV rejected other black artists' videos, such as Rick James' "Super Freak", because they did not fit the channel's carefully selected AOR format at the time. A black woman, Carolyn B. Baker who was MTV's original head of talent and acquisition had personally rejected Rick James' video for Super Freak "because there were half-naked women in it, and it was a piece of crap. As a black woman, I did not want that representing my people as the first black video on MTV."



  Musical Happenings in 1981:
  • Gospel singer James Cleveland becomes the first with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

  • The breakthrough release for the gospel dynasty the Winan family, Introducing the Winans, is released.

  • MTV premiers, showing the first of its music videos.

  • 1981 - Talented bandleader Duke Ellington's musical "Sophisticated Ladies," premieres in New York City.

  • 1981 - Singers Stevie Wonder and Paul McCartney record the song "Ebony & Ivory"



 American Music Awards winners in 1981:
    The American Music Awards was created by Dick Clark to compete with the Grammy Awards. Michael Jackson and Donny Osmond co-hosted the first award show with Rodney Allen Rippy and Ricky Segall in 1974. Unlike the Grammys, which are awarded on the basis of votes by members of the Recording Academy, the AMAs are determined by a poll of the public and fans, who can vote through the AMAs website.

    Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist
  • Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Female Artist
  • Diana Ross

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Band, Duo, or Group
  • Earth Wind and Fire

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Album
  • Off the Wall - Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Single
  • "Upside Down" - Diana Ross

  • Award of Merit
  • Chuck Berry


 Grammy winners in 1981:
    The 23rd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 25, 1981, at Radio City Music Hall in New York City and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1980.

    Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
  • Henry Lewis (conductor), Leontyne Price & the Philharmonia Orchestra for Prima Donna, Vol. 5 - Great Soprano Arias From Handel to Britten


  • Best Instrumental Arrangement
  • Jerry Hey & Quincy Jones (arrangers) for "Dinorah, Dinorah" performed by George Benson


  • Best Gospel Performance, Contemporary or Inspirational
  • The Archers, Cynthia Clawson, Andrae Crouch, Tramaine Hawkins, Walter Hawkins, Dony McGuire, Reba Rambo & B.J. Thomas for The Lord's Prayer


  • Best Soul Gospel Performance, Traditional
  • James Cleveland & the Charles Fold Singers for Lord, Let Me Be an Instrument


  • Best Soul Gospel Performance, Contemporary
  • Shirley Caesar for Rejoice


  • Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female
  • Ella Fitzgerald for A Perfect Match


  • Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male
  • George Benson for "Moody's Mood"


  • Best Instrumental Jazz Performance, Big Band
  • Count Basie for On the Road


  • Best Pop Instrumental Performance
  • One on One-Bob James & Earl Klugh


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
  • Stephanie Mills for "Never Knew Love Like This Before"


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
  • George Benson for Give Me the Night


  • Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal
  • The Manhattans for "Shining Star"


  • Best R&B Instrumental Performance
  • George Benson for "Off Broadway"


  • Best Rhythm & Blues Song
  • James Mtume & Reggie Lucas (songwriters) for "Never Knew Love Like This Before" performed by Stephanie Mills


  • Hall of Fame Award
  • "Black and Tan Fantasy" Duke Ellington & His Orchestra




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Womens fashions in the 1980s
Womens fashions in the 1980s
photo #105-yr-1980

mens fashions in the 1980s
Mens fashions in the 1980s
photo #106-yr-1980

Womens fashions in the 1980s
The rah-rah skirt is a short flounced layered skirt that originated in cheerleading and became a popular fashion trend among teenage girls in the early 1980s. Later in the 1980s it was often worn with leather, denim or lace.
photo #107-yr-1980

hairstyles in the 1980s
Jheri curl hairstyle worn in the 1980s.
photo #108-yr-1980

     Fashions and Styles in 1981

  Popular Fashions:

    Women:
    The early 1980s were very different from the rest of the decade, with some carryovers from the late 1970s. Clothing colors were subdued, quiet and basic; varying shades of brown, tan, and orange were common. Fashionable clothing in the early 1980s included both unisex and gender-specific attire. Widespread fashions for women in the early 1980s included sweaters (including turtleneck, crew neck, and v-neck varieties); fur-lined puffer jackets; tunics; faux-fur coats; velvet blazers; trench coats (made in both fake and real leather); crop tops; tube tops; knee-length skirts (of no prescribed length, as designers opted for choice); loose, flowy, knee-length dresses (with high-cut and low-cut necklines, varying sleeve lengths, and made in a variety of fabrics including cotton, silk, satin, and polyester); high-waisted loose pants; embroidered jeans; leather pants; and designer jeans. Women's pants of the 1980s were, in general, worn with long inseams - a style carried over from the 1970s. Accessories for women included thin belts, knee-high boots with thick kitten heels, sneakers, jelly shoes (a new trend at the time), mules, round-toed shoes and boots, jelly bracelets (inspired by Madonna in 1983), shoes with thick heels, small, thin necklaces (with a variety of materials, such as gold and pearls), and small watches. The fitness craze of the 1970s continued into the early 1980s. General women's street-wear worn in the early 1980s included ripped sweatshirts, leotards, tights, sweatpants, and tracksuits (especially ones made in velour). Prior to the mid-1980s, it had been taboo to show a slip or a bra strap in public. A visible undergarment had been a sign of social ineptness. With the new fashion's most extreme forms, young women would forgo conventional outer-garments for vintage-style bustiers with lacy slips and several large crucifixes.


    Men:
    In the early 1980s, fashion had carried onward from the late 1970s. Athletic clothes were more popular than jeans during this period, as were more subdued colors. Looser pants remained popular during this time, being fairly wide but straight, and tighter shirts were especially popular. The general public, at this time, wanted to wear low-maintenance clothing with more basic colors, as the global recession going on at the time kept extravagant clothes out of reach. Popular clothing in the early 1980s worn by men includes tracksuits, v-neck sweaters, polyester and velour polo-neck shirts, sports jerseys, straight-leg jeans, polyester button-ups, cowboy boots, beanies, and hoodies. In the mid 1980s, popular trends included wool sport coats, Levi 501s, Hawaiian shirts, shell suits, hand-knit sweaters, sports shirts, hoodies, flannel shirts, reversible flannel vests, jackets with the insides quilted, nylon jackets, gold rings, spandex cycling shorts, cowboy boots, and khaki pants with jagged seams. T-shirts underneath expensive suit jackets with broad, padded shoulders, hawaiian shirts (complemented with sport coats, often with top-stitched lapels for a "custom-tailored" look), and (in counterpoint to the bright shirt) jackets that were often gray, tan, rust or white. Easy-care micro-suede and corduroy jackets became popular choices, especially those with a Western style.


    Rap and hip-hop:
    Athletic shoes had been worn as casual wear before, but for the first time they became a high-priced fashion item. Converse shoes were popular in the first half of the 1980s. Air Jordan basketball shoes (named for basketball player Michael Jordan) made their debut in 1984. The NBA banned these shoes from games when they debuted, which increased their cachet. Soon, other manufacturers introduced premium athletic shoes. Adidas sneakers took the decade by storm, becoming popular among teenage boys and young men; the Adidas sneaker was popularized by the Run-D.M.C. song My Adidas. Nike had a similar share of the market, with Air Max and similar shoes. High-tops, especially of white or black leather, became popular. In the early 1980s, long and white athletic socks, often calf-high or knee-high, were worn with sneakers. As the decade progressed, socks trended shorter, eventually topping out just above the height of the shoe. Ensembles featuring the colors of Africa (green, yellow and red) became wildly popular among African Americans, as did kente cloth. In the urban hip-hop communities, sneakers were usually worn unlaced and with a large amount of gold jewelry, as well as headwraps.


    Hairstyles:
    The Jheri curl often spelled Jerry curl or Jeri Curl is a permed hairstyle that was common and popular among African American, Black Canadian, and Black British, especially during the 1980s and the 1990s. Invented by the hairdresser Jheri Redding, the Jheri curl gave the wearer a glossy, loosely curled look. It was touted as a "wash and wear" style that was easier to care for than the other popular chemical treatment of the day, the relaxer.



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the meaning of cool
How did "acting" Cool begin for African Americans?

It seems like it's been around forever and
expected of every black kid growing up



For most blacks, cool started on the southern plantations. Opportunists slavemasters devised a way for slaves to work harder and reap the benefits of their labor. During the year at a chosen plantation slave masters would hold a "Corn Shucking Festival." Slaves from nearby plantations would also join this event with their owner's permission, so it was almost like a community gathering of all the local slaves, with greedy slavemasters making all the money.

The slave who shucked the most corn won an award, sometimes cash or a suit of clothes. Anyone who found a red ear of corn also received a reward - perhaps a kiss from a young woman or a jug of whiskey. It was at these events that the term Shuckin' and jivin' came into existence by the slaves while working and telling tall stories, talking smack, and joking around with each other.

These gatherings, even though involving hard work had to be an event looked forward to by the slaves, because it was one of the few times during the year blacks had a chance to interact with one another. Shuckin' and jivin' would become a tool the slaves would use to convince their masters of an untruth, and even among themselves. It was an early form of being cool.
http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Corn-Shucking+Festival

After slavery blacks were free (sort of) to do as they pleased. Most blacks wanted to assimilate into American culture very much but were shut out by the white racist. African and European culture met head on in what was supposed to be fair in America guaranteed by our Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, but blacks didn't stand a chance.


Why, what happened?

Because most whites banded together by breaking the law and made blacks second class citizens and would go on to murder, lynch, rape, humiliate them all the way until the 1960s Civil Rights movement. After Lincoln, every single United States President was aware of this and did nothing. Whites achieved like crazy and prospered while blacks lagged far behind and got along the best way they knew how.

Blacks disliked whites very much for this terrible treatment and instead of violent disobedience, they protested by living their lives opposite of white culture. I mean let's face it, why would blacks want to imitate or become a part of a race of people that hated them?

This is when being cool became a symbol of white resistance and protest. Being cool would show you were down with the struggle. During slavery, we had already created our language which was AAVE and many blacks communicated this way. Any black that did not use it was looked down as trying to act white, joining the enemy sort of speak.

We developed our own way of walking with a proud gait, (George Jefferson strut) our own style of music, our own style of dance, our own style of food, our own style of worship, that didn't have anything in common with white folks and that suited blacks just fine. We were poor, but we were proud and cool and everyone who practiced these traits was cool and a part of the resistance.

In the process, we were creating a new culture that was admired over the world. Blacks have always had a remarkable ability to create something out of nothing. But sadly there was significant risk with this lifestyle in a great country such as America.

What were the downfalls?

Oscar Micheaux felt it was wrong for blacks to live this way in America. Oscar was an African American author, film director and independent producer of more than 44 movies and he is regarded as the first major African-American feature filmmaker, the most successful African-American filmmaker of the first half of the twentieth century and the most prominent producer of race films. He produced both silent movies and "talkies" after the industry changed to incorporate speaking actors.

cool black americans


Oscar felt that blacks should become aggressive and use their brainpower in achieving instead of just settling for what the white man doled out. This man lived in some of the most racist times in American history, but he didn't let that stop him from fulfilling his dreams and doing it the legal way.

Evidently, Oscar had a brother who was the very cool type and was content on just putting up a show, or a front as living a successful life. We all know the type. A person that was living beyond his means. Blacks of his day called this way of living “the good life.”

Oscar didn't like it and was very upset with his brother. He later wrote in his book and discussed the culture of doers who want to accomplish, and those who see themselves as victims of injustice and hopelessness, and do not want to step out and try to succeed, but instead like to dress up, act cool and pretend to be successful while living the city lifestyle in poverty.

cool black americans


Oscar understood that education doesn't belong only to white people, it's a gift for all humanity to better ourselves, and honestly the best-proven way. Chinese, Japanese, Middle-Eastern and all other non-white nations understand this and have prospered by education. It's one of humanities treasure to learn.

But many blacks associated education with white and stayed far away from it, to continue with their cool lifestyle. A foolish mistake, and just what racist whites want you to believe.

Early Europeans completely dominated the Africans because they were better educated. They had guns we had spears, you do the math. In Africa our ancestors didn't value education, but traditions and silly ones at that. But that didn't save them. Education would have, though.

So without a doubt, it is entirely wrong to associate teaching and learning to white people. Many of us would look down upon another black who tried to better himself through education by saying they were trying to act white, and it wasn't cool. Racist whites laughed at us for believing this way because they knew we would always be behind.

After the 1960s, when our full Civil Rights were finally restored, many blacks chose to live the more standard American way by attending school to learn. But many also wanted to remain trapped in time with the old AAVE living in what they still perceived as defiance to the white American way of doing things. But were they only hurting themselves?

Later in time, being cool had become so prevalent in the black community it confused many kids, because they didn't quite understand if they were going to hang out with the cool kids or the so-called boring kids who liked to read and learn. At an early age, they are at a critical crossroad. Taking the cool route may seem easier, and a lot of fun, but would be a devastating mistake.

After the Civil Rights era we now have the opportunity to attend school and achieve as much as we can, but being cool has snatched many of the black kids and locked them into a culture hating education and in the process ruining their young lives.

Many entertainment figures reap much money from this cool culture by portraying cool as, well cool. They tell impressionable ones what's cool to hear, talk about, wear, eat, etc. and at the same time padding their cool humongous bank accounts.

These even get on television and flaunt their riches in a youngster's face never explicitly teaching on how they might be as successful, without being dishonest, stealing or selling drugs. Education is not cool for them to preach.

One thing is for sure, being cool can be a lot of fun and there's no denying that. Everybody wants to be liked, and it seems like cool people are respected and admired the most, from the clothes they wear to the type of songs they listen to the way they talk, the effortless way they seem to accomplish every task is amazing.

They possess incredible confidence. But truthfully everything they've accomplished wouldn't have been possible without the sacrifices of our wonderful ancestors. So don't you agree we owe a particular moral responsibility to them?

Kids should remember cool is not the real deal, It's a game we can't get caught up in. Our ancestors endured so much so we could achieve. We should never forget that. That's what this site was created. Browse through its pages, and you're going to read stories of amazing blacks.

They made it possible for us, and we're sure they would advise us to achieve through education first and foremost and save the cool for the weekends, and I ain't Shuckin and Jivin!

the meaning of cool


Resources:
By White House (Pete Souza) / Maison Blanche (Pete Souza) (The Official White House Photostream[1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Senate Office of Richard Lugar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
https://pixabay.com/en/flag-united-states-american-waving-40724/



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United States Census for Negroes
United States Census for African Americans
in the 1980s

pac man game

HIV

Eubie Blake
Eubie Blake
photo #105-yr-1883

Marian Anderson
Marian Anderson
photo #104-yr-1955

Our Community in 1981
Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:

  • HIV and without treatment, average survival time after infection with HIV is estimated to be 9 to 11 years. Trivia:Infection with HIV occurs by the transfer of blood, semen, vaginal fluid, pre-ejaculate, or breast milk. Within these bodily fluids, HIV is present as both free virus particles and virus within infected immune cells. AIDS was first clinically observed in 1981 in the United States. The initial cases were a cluster of injection drug users and gay men in the in Los Angeles, California area.

  • 1981 - Eubie Blake received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded by President Ronald Reagan.


  • Opera singer Marian Anderson  was recognized with the George Peabody Medal.

  • 1980s - Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, virtually synonymous with video games, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and first released in Japan on May 22, 1980.


  • 1980s - Less than a school year differentiated the years of schooling attained by African Americans and white Americans born after 1980.

  • 1980s - The United States Population is 226,504,825 with a total of 26,482,349 being African Americans.




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RESOURCES:


Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License


#100 -   By Newtown graffiti CC-BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

#101 -   By Markmcgee at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia; originally at [1]) [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

#102 -   By Ira Rosenberg [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103 -   By AdonisRouse (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#104 -  
See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#105 -  
This image or file is a work of a Drug Enforcement Administration employee, taken or made as part of that person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain in the United States. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crack_epidemic

#106 -  
By Motown Records (eBay frontback) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#107 -  
This work is in the public domain because it was published in the United States between 1978 and March 1, 1989 without a copyright notice, and its copyright was not subsequently registered with the U.S. Copyright Office within 5 years. Unless its author has been dead for several years, it is copyrighted in the countries or areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada (50 pma), Mainland China (50 pma, not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany (70 pma), Mexico (100 pma), Switzerland (70 pma), and other countries with individual treaties. See this page for further explanation.

#108 -  
By U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Kyle T. Voigt. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


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