blast from the past

blast from the past
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks




  Navigation:   Features:


  Blast From The Past:
update information




divider of content




divider of content


divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
annual hamite award

 
OUR 1943 HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1943:
George Washington Carver
    George Washington Carver was without a doubt an inspiration to his race. It seemed to be a common belief at that time it wasn't possible for a black man to achieve, no doubt spread by racist white southerners. But George Washington Carver put a dent in that theory, and even under aa extremely racist atmosphere. After all of his accomplishments, there were some who didn't want anything to do with him because of his color.

    Carver applied to several colleges before being accepted at Highland College in Highland, Kansas. When he arrived, however, they rejected him because of his race. In 1890, Carver started studying art and piano at Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa. His art teacher, Etta Budd, recognized Carver's talent for painting flowers and plants; she encouraged him to study botany at Iowa State Agricultural College in Ames. When he began there in 1891, he was the first black student. Carver's Bachelor's thesis was "Plants as Modified by Man," dated 1894

    Iowa State professors Joseph Budd and Louis Pammel convinced Carver to continue there for his master's degree. Carver did research at the Iowa Experiment Station under Pammel during the next two years. His work at the experiment station in plant pathology and mycology first gained him national recognition and respect as a botanist. Carver taught as the first black faculty member at Iowa State.

    In 1896, Booker T. Washington, the first principal and president of the Tuskegee Institute, invited Carver to head its Agriculture Department. Carver taught there for 47 years, developing the department into an active research center and working with two additional college presidents during his tenure. He taught methods of crop rotation, introduced several alternative cash crops for farmers that would also improve the soil of areas heavily cultivated in cotton, initiated research into crop products (chemurgy), and taught generations of black students farming techniques for self-sufficiency.

    He wanted poor farmers to grow alternative crops both as a source of their food and as a source of other products to improve their quality of life. T

    He most popular of his 44 practical bulletins for farmers contained 105 food recipes using peanuts. He also developed and promoted about 100 products made from peanuts that were useful for the house and farm, including cosmetics, dyes, paints, plastics, gasoline, and nitroglycerin. He received numerous honors for his work, including the Spingarn Medal of the NAACP.

    He was recognized for his many achievements and talents. In 1941, Time magazine dubbed Carver a "Black Leonardo".

    Carver viewed faith in Jesus Christ as a means of destroying both barriers of racial disharmony and social stratification. He was as concerned with his students' character development as he was with their intellectual development.

    He compiled a list of eight cardinal virtues for his students to strive toward:

  • Be clean both inside and out.

  • Neither look up to the rich nor down on the poor.

  • Lose, if need be, without squealing.

  • Win without bragging.

  • Always be considerate of women, children, and older people.

  • Be too brave to lie.

  • Be too generous to cheat.

  • Take your share of the world and let others take theirs

  • Excellent advice George!

    George was born into slavery having almost his entire family kidnapped and sold. George didn't let conditions of the world destine his life. He took matters into his hands and became one of the most widely respected scientists in the world. George died in 1943 at the age of 79. We bestow the 1943 Hamite Award to this great man who proved that despite opposition, we could achieve and attain success and soar like the eagles.

annual hamite award
George Washington Carver
photo#102-yr-1943


annual hamite award
George Washington Carver, American botanist and inventor, at work in his laboratory
photo#111-yr-1943


annual hamite award


divider for amazing blacks


How were blacks feeling in 1943?
sad mood of blacks


WORLD WAR II CONTINUES!

THINGS ARE GETTING REALLY SCARY
NOW THEY WANT US TO RATION EVERYTHING
FROM GROCERIES TO GASOLINE
IT'S GETTING CRAZY MAN!


ration book in ww2

During the war civilians first received ration books—War Ration Book Number One, or the "Sugar Book" through more than 100,000 schoolteachers, PTA groups, and other volunteers. A national speed limit of 35 miles per hour was imposed to save fuel and rubber for tires. Volunteers helped distribute gasoline cards.

To get a classification and rationing stamps, one had to appear before a local War Price and Rationing Board. Each person in a household received a ration book, including babies and small children who qualified for canned milk not available to others. To obtain a gasoline ration card, a person had to certify a need for gasoline and ownership of no more than five tires.

All tires more than five per driver were confiscated by the government, because of rubber shortages. An "A" sticker on a car was the lowest priority of gasoline rationing and entitled the car owner to 3 to 4 US gallons per week. B stickers were issued to workers in the military industry, entitling their holder up to 8 US gallons per week. C labels were granted to persons deemed essential to the war effort, such as doctors. T-rations were made available for truckers.

Lastly, X stickers on cars entitled the holder to unlimited supplies and were the highest priority in the system. Ministers, police, firefighters, and civil defense workers were in this category.

A scandal erupted when 200 Congressmen received these X stickers.
THE MORE THINGS CHANGE THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME. (LOL)

Fox Lake in Angola Indiana
Fox Lake Resort

Moving on up to the eastside!!!! That's what I'm talking about. We finally have a place to travel for fun and relaxation. We just hope our white American brothers don't burn it down or deny/jack up the electricity and water rates or claim eminent domain like they did with other resorts blacks attempted to set up.

Even though the average black person cannot afford to visit or live in Fox Lake, it's still nice to know some of our peoples are enjoying the life and gives us the motivation to fight even harder this high wall of racism. I ain't mad at cha!

The Fox Lake resort community was developed in Angola, Indiana specifically for African Americans in the 1930s, when such communities were quite rare. In the years between World War I and World War II, and for some time after that, African American were not welcomed to traditionally white resort communities. Fox Lake provided black families with a place of their own where they could escape the heat of the cities and enjoy the pleasures of summertime activities. The historic district contains 32 relatively modest lake cottages, most of which were constructed before World War II.

Occasionally big-name musicians were booked for dances at the clubhouse, which was surrounded by tennis courts, horseshoe pits, and basketball hoops. Saddle horses were available until the early 1950s. Other activities included trap shooting matches, weekly Family Night at the restaurant, and Sunday school held on the beach under the trees.

Today, Fox Lake is still a prosperous black community. Its traditions are still maintained by many second- and third-generation owners, who occupy a large number of the cottages.

What an wonderful history!!!

http://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/afam/2002/foxlake.htm
http://foxlakeindiana.com/



American Beach, Florida

American Beach, Florida was founded in 1935 by Florida's first black millionaire, Abraham Lincoln Lewis, and his Afro-American Life Insurance Company. The plan was for his employees to have a place to vacation and own homes for their families by the shore.

(thank you so much Abraham, we needed this!) Throughout the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, summers at American Beach were busy with families, churches, and children. It was a place where African Americans could enjoy "Recreation and Relaxation Without Humiliation." The beach included hotels, restaurants, bathhouses, and nightclubs as well as homes and other businesses.

American Beach, Florida
photo #109-yr-1935

American Beach played host to numerous celebrities during this period, including folklorist Zora Neale Hurston, singer Billie Daniels, Cab Calloway, Ray Charles, Billy Eckstein, Hank Aaron, Joe Louis, actor Ossie Davis, and Sherman Hemsley. We know they had some fun! That's what I'm talking bout!



divider for amazing blacks


african american first

 For the year 1943:
  • Martin A. Martin was the first African-American was the first African-American to become a member of the Trial Bureau of the United States Department of Justice.

  • The Mills Brothers were the first African-American artists to have a #1 hit on the Billboard charts.



divider for amazing blacks


blacks in sports

Josh Gibson
Negro League legend Josh Gibson's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.
photo #115-yr-1943

      Sports in 1943
  • In the 1943 Negro World Series, the Washington Homestead Grays, champions of the Negro National League beat the Birmingham Black Barons, champions of the Negro American League, four games to three, with one tie. The games were played in seven different cities.

  • The New York Black Yankees was founded in Harlem as the Harlem Black Bombers in 1931 by financier James "Soldier Boy" Semler and dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. The team was active in the Negro Leagues from 1931 to 1948.


  • 1943 - Negro League star Josh Gibson suffers a nervous breakdown. Trivia: Gibson was known as the "Black Babe Ruth", in fact, some fans at the time who saw both Ruth and Gibson play, called Ruth "the white Josh Gibson". Gibson never played in the major leagues. He died of a stroke in Pittsburgh in 1947 at age 35 just three months before Jackie Robinson became the first black player in modern major league history. Some believe the stroke was linked to drug problems that plagued him in his later years, and some of his friends who actually played with him felt he was heartbroken by not getting the recognition being the first to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, because many felt that Jackie Robinson (although an excellent player) wasn't the best, but Josh Gibson was.

colored world series
photo #104-yr-1924

1943 Colored World Series
 12*3*4567*8Games
Washington Homestead Grays254910808 4
Birmingham Black Barons453011014 3
* indicates extra innings

  Location: Washington: Griffith Stadium (1,3)
  Baltimore: Bugle Field (2)
  Chicago: Comiskey Park (4)
  Columbus: Red Bird Stadium (5)
  Indianapolis: Victory Field (6)
  Birmingham: Rickwood Park (7)
  Montgomery: Cramton Bowl (8)
  Format: Best-of-seven
  Managers: Washington: Candy Jim Taylor   Birmingham: Gus Welch
  Dates: September 21–October 5
  Hall of Famers: Washington: Cool Papa Bell, Ray Brown,
  Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard, Jud Wilson





divider for amazing blacks


blacks and politics

Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
photo #110-yr-1933

Eleanor Roosevelt
Eleanor Roosevelt
photo #109-yr-1933

Henry  Wallace
Henry Wallace
photo #112-yr-1941

     Political Scene in 1943
  • Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt commonly known by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States. Analysis: O.K. Mr. Roosevelt, we have studied your record on civil rights for the African-American and came to the conclusion that you put the problems of the world first before your black American citizens and perhaps if it weren't for your wife, Eleanor the civil rights movement would have taken longer to get off the ground. We know Roosevelt was loved by blacks and other races in his day, but from our vantage point in time, I searched high and low for concrete facts about laws he initiated to help black citizens. He did have some shining moments, though, but to me, it always seemed like he did it after being pushed into it by someone. Maybe I'm wrong, and if anybody knows something I don't I will be more than happy to change my assessment of this president, because believe it or not, we don't look for bad, we want to find good things they did for American citizens, and history won't lie. Franklin D. Roosevelt was the typical politician when it came to Negro civil rights, which meant they were not serious in demanding the enforcement of our rights. Roosevelt, like previous presidents, was afraid of the racist Southerners vote who in effect held America as a hostage with weak, spineless leaders. To Roosevelt's credit when he had Henry A. Wallace in 1941 as his Vice President this spoke volumes about the type of person Roosevelt was. Wallace had once studied under George Washington Carver as a young boy. Carver was a well respected black scientist by most which led Wallace to make the claim that white superiority was a hoax and all men were created equal in ability if given the opportunity. White racist was livid and demanded Roosevelt drop Wallace from the ticket to which he refused and threatened to drop out of the race all together until Eleanor addressed the convention floor to change the party's mind and her eventually her husband's also. We give big kudos to Roosevelt for this and notice a change in the air for human rights. But on the other hand former Presiden Woodrow Wilson who went down in history as one of the most racist Presidents in America was a hero to Roosevelt who admired his vision for America and the world. Also during WWII Winston Churchhill was in dire need of assistance from the U.S. to fight Hitler's Germany and didn't have the money to complete a successful war campaign. Roosevelt offered him help under one condition that he dissolved colonial rule over the many countries around the world that Britain controlled, of course, Churchill didn't have a choice and agreed. So Roosevelt envisioned a new society where all the world could live in peace and free from the domination of other governments, but of course, the black citizens in his country would take the back burner. But at least he was trying, unlike his predecessors. Roosevelt came from a Dutch family, and the Dutch in America had a history of being fair to blacks and looked upon them as regular people like themselves, so we thought this president would actually WANT to help us. He never instigated any helpful Negro policy on his accord, for example, he signed an important piece of legislation to put America to work with the (Work Projects Administration; WPA program) in his New Deal promises. But because of racism blacks were being left out. He didn't have the motivation to act on his own to find the reason for this, it took his concerned wife Eleanor to speak up to this injustice against the American black person and eventually put many blacks to work. Eleanor had blacks coming and going out of the White House, and it probably got to the point where white people were saying to themselves "There's goes the neighborhood" She was a trendsetter for sure, loved by all races of people. Believe it or not, we think without a doubt she was the real catalyst for the Civil Rights movement, because of her concern for Negro citizens and the influence she had on her husband in getting favorable results. She helped opened the door for us, and we took advantage with the burgeoning rights movement. She, in my opinion, was a real first lady. Blacks loved her. Another occasion was when blacks were demanding an integrated Federal government, which he didn't want to get involved with until Civil Rights leader A. Philip Randolph threatened to march thousands of protesters on Washington D.C. This was the beginning of the integration of the Federal government providing fruits even today because of the multitude of black government workers we have. With Roosevelt's handling of the Japanese citizens by sending them to prison camps wasn't a good idea, and resentment still holds today for many. Franklin Roosevelt has been rated as one of the top three presidents ever, and after much thought, I think we agree. He wasn't a particularly bad or mean president, and he was better than the recent ones we've had. Franklin Roosevelt loved women and had affairs while serving as U.S. President. Eleanor was acutely aware of his womanizing ways and still supported him but lived separately from him. She still had influence over him, because if not the Negro would have been in worse shape because she was a real American who wanted all citizens to enjoy a fair slice of America success. She was an excellent first lady who understood.



  • 1943 - Henry A. Wallace was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–1945). Wallace was a strong supporter of New Deal liberalism, rapid desegregation, and softer policies towards the Soviet Union. His public feuds with other officials caused significant controversy during his time as Vice President under Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the midst of World War II, and resulted in Democrats dropping him from the ticket in the 1944 election for Senator Harry S Truman. Analysis: Credit is given to President Roosevelt for choosing a man like Henry A. Wallace for the Vice President. Why? Because Wallace was one of those rare white Americans who had sincerely felt all citizens, deserve justice and equality in America. When this site happens upon one of these great individuals it makes up super excited; it's almost like finding refreshing water in a barren desert. Black scientist George Washington Carver was a major influence in the life of Wallace when he was a boy. Carver was acquainted with Henry's dad who was a president of Iowa State College. The father invited Carver to the family home, and Carver would go on walks with the boy throughout the property and helped him to identify species of plants and plant parts. In the greenhouse, he taught Young Henry about plant breeding. They would experiment with diseased plants and crop breeding. As he grew older, Henry Wallace would denounce the foolish white superiority theory. He stated that all are created equal and can achieve if given the opportunity, something that blacks were denied. Wallace served as Secretary of Agriculture until September 1940, after Franklin Roosevelt selected him as his running mate on the 1940 presidential ticket. Wallace was the type of man who bucked the system. He was very much like the Radical Republicans of yesteryear. Most white lawmakers didn't like him so much so that Roosevelt dropped him from the next election for Harry Truman. In 1948 Wallace would make an unsuccessful run as the Progressive Party's presidential candidate in the 1948 U.S. presidential election. His platform advocated universal government health insurance, an end to the nascent Cold War, full voting rights for black Americans, and an end to segregation. His campaign included African American candidates campaigning alongside white candidates in the segregated South, and he also refused to appear before segregated audiences or to eat or stay in segregated establishments. Time magazine, which opposed the Wallace candidacy, described Wallace as "ostentatiously" riding through the towns and cities of the segregated South "with his Negro secretary beside him." A barrage of eggs and tomatoes were hurled at Wallace and struck him and his campaign members during the tour.



divider for amazing blacks


Who is this man?

His name was James F. Byrnes who was a major advisor/contributor to the events of World WarII. Byrnes was a protégé of Benjamin Tillman (who was known as "Pitchfork Ben") and often had a moderating influence on the fiery segregationist Senator of South Carolina. He would later go on to work for the very prejudice President Woodrow Wilson who often entrusted important political tasks to the capable young representative rather than to more veteran lawmakers.

James Byrnes


During his time in the U.S. Senate, he was regarded as the most influential man on the floor. He had long been friends with Franklin D. Roosevelt, whom he supported for the Democratic nomination in 1932, and made himself the President's spokesman on the Senate floor.

Byrnes played a key role in blocking anti-lynching legislation, notably the Castigan-Wagner bill of 1935 and the Gavagan bill of 1937. Byrnes even claimed that lynching was necessary "to hold in check the Negro in the South," saying "rape is responsible, directly and indirectly, for most of the lynching in America"

During the war, Byrnes would advise the President on vital and grave matters which very often he embellished details. Roosevelt trusted him. A very popular Henry A. Wallace was Roosevelts Vice President, and the two would grow to dislike each other. Wallace was a man of the people. He felt that blacks should receive equal pay for equal work and was against the superior white theory and felt if blacks were given opportunity they would be just as successful as whites.

As a boy, Wallace had the honor of studying under the famous black scientist George Washington Carver. Many racist southerners didn't care for Wallace and worked with Byrnes to get him off the ticket. When Wallace ran for a second term for the Democratic nomination, he was seconds away from grabbing the honor but lost out on the convention floor because of shady backdoor politics Byrnes had managed against him, and the party ended up choosing Harry Truman as the Vice President nominee.

Roosevelt during this time was frail and sickly and perhaps didn't have the energy to stand up for Wallace who he liked just as much as Byrnes. After Roosevelt's death, Bynes would advise Harry Truman in important matters often omitting critical information the President should have known. In time Truman grew weary of Byrnes and got rid of him. Byrnes would then go on to becoming the Governor of South Carolina from 1951 to 1955, in which capacity he vigorously criticized the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education. Supporting segregation in education, the Democratic governor stated in his inaugural address.

"Whatever is necessary to continue the separation of the races in the schools of South Carolina is going to be done by the white people of the state. That is my ticket as a private citizen. It will be my ticket as governor." —James F. Byrnes



divider for amazing blacks


The Manhattan Project

The Manhattan Project began in 1939 and ended in 1946. It was a research and development project that produced the first nuclear weapons during World War II. It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom and Canada.

The U.K. started their own atomic project first but didn't have funding to keep up with research and building so they ended up sharing all their scientific data with the United States which quickly surpassed and allowed them to stay in the game.

manhattan project
The Manhattan Project created the first nuclear bombs.The Trinity test is shown.



manhattan project

Most people working in the factories didn't understand what they were involved with. They were just happy to get a steady paycheck. Many residents continued to avoid discussion of "the stuff" in ordinary conversation despite it being the reason for their town's existence.

The Manhattan Project began modestly in 1939, but grew to employ more than 130,000 people in select cities across America and cost nearly US$2 billion (about $26 billion in 2016 dollars)





divider for amazing blacks


black marines
Members of the 3d Ammunition Company, part of the 2nd Marine Division,
relax with a captured bicycle during a break from their role in the Battle of Saipan.

photo #111- in year 1942

blacks in ww2


Army Flight School at Tuskegee
"Keep us flying. Buy War Bonds." Color poster of a Tuskegee Airman (probably Lt. Robert W. Diez) by an unidentified artist. 1943.
photo #112-yr-1943

     World War II in 1943
  • 1943 - Blacks allowed in America's naval schools for the first time.

  • 1943 - Tuskegee Institute Alabama Army Flight School produces the The first black cadets graduates.

  • 1943 - 14,000 Black American soldiers are stationed in the Arizona desert at Fort Huachuca for training. 300 were of the Womens Army Auxiliary Corps. This was the largest gathering of black soldiers in the history of America.

  • 1943 - Two American Navy Destroyer ships, the USS Mason, and the submarine chaser, PC1264, are staffed entirely by African American crews. Trivia: The late great Ossie Davis made a movie about the USS Mason which was very entertaining and informative. It was entitled "Proud" on DVD.

  • 1943 - Tuskegee Airmen fly their very first mission in Italy.


  • Trivia: The Tuskegee Airmen overcame segregation and prejudice to become one of the most highly respected fighter groups of World War II. They proved conclusively that African Americans could fly and maintain sophisticated combat aircraft. The Tuskegee Airmen's achievements, together with the men and women who supported them, paved the way for full integration of the U.S. military.


annual hamite award
Moton Field Flight Instructors in front of BT-13 Stearmans
photo #113-yr-1943



divider for amazing blacks


Treasures of humanity



racism

A man lynched from a tree
A man lynched from a tree. Face partially concealed by angle and headgear.
photo #109-yr-1906

     Race in 1943
  • June 20-22, 1943 - The Detroit Race Riot broke out in Detroit, Michigan, lasting for three days before Federal troops regained control. The rioting between blacks and whites and continued until June 22, killing 34, wounding 433, and destroying property valued at $2 million. Trivia: Over the course of three days, 34 people were killed. Of them, 25 were African–Americans, 17 of whom were killed by the police. Thirteen murders remain unsolved. Out of the approximately 600 injured, black people accounted for more than 75 percent, and of the roughly 1,800 people who were arrested over the course of the three-day riots, black people accounted for 85 percent. Yeah what else is new? Black lives don't matter!

detroit riots of 1943
Detroit, Michigan. Riot at the Sojourner Truth homes, a new U.S. federal housing project,
caused by white neighbors' attempt to prevent Negro tenants from moving in. Sign with American flag
"We want white tenants in our white community," directly opposite the housing project.

photo #110-yr-1943



divider for amazing blacks


why do others dislike black people

good black americans
"It is worthy of emphasis, that the antiquity of the Negro race is beyond dispute. His brightest days were when history was an infant; and, since he early turned from God, he has found the cold face of hate and the hurtful hand of the Caucasian against him."   George Washington Williams


Dislike of black people is a relatively new phenomenon that started after the 16th century. Before this time there wasn't a thing such as racial prejudices. If color issues did arise, it was an infrequent occurrence. It's hardly mentioned in history books. For the most part, skin color was not a factor.




In fact, it's well documented how the early Greek philosophers who were all white, Socrates, Herodotus, Thales, Alexander the Great, Aristotle among others happily mingled with the blacks. Africa was known as the learning capital of the world, and many philosophers traveled to Africa to study about everything from philosophy to mathematics. Pythagoras is believed to have made it the furthest, having studied in Kemet for 23 years.


The Greek Poet Homer was one of those travelers and made the following statement:
"In ancient times the blacks were known to be so gentle to
strangers that many believed that the gods sprang from them.
Homer sings of the Ocean, father of the gods; and says that
when Jupiter wishes to take a holiday, he visits the sea,
and goes to the banquets of the blacks,--a people humble,
courteous, and devout."

Mr. Reade http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15735/15735.txt


Black people had a good reputation for being intelligent, kind and hospitable and enjoying an advanced civilization that the Greeks envied. If alive today, Greek scholars would find it surprising how a person might believe in superiority simply because of skin color.


science failed humanity


What happened?


    History makes the answer easy. After the 16th century, race became an issue for whites because of three dynamics. Greed, science, and white history (legacy).

  • Greed
  • The trans-Atlantic slave trade was about greed. Free black labor aided in making Europeans countries and America very rich on the backs of black slaves. This created animosity between the blacks and whites.

  • Erroneous science theories
  • The introduction of false science teaching aided European and Americans in abandoning their conscience, because science didn't require one. Early Western philosophy advocated peace and treating all men with respect, but subsequent white generations did the opposite. Whites started to feel like gods themselves with their advancements in science and began to exhibit hubris, which is a Greek word denoting overconfident pride combined with arrogance. In other words, their heads became too big.

  • Incomplete history recording
  • Eurocentric history is always portrayed as the centerpiece of world history. African history was habitually erased by invading troops to eliminate its contributions and accomplishments to the world while preserving their European legacy. White history regularly portrays Africa as a wasteland full of ignorant savages, but current excavations prove the opposite. Africa was a developed continent with advanced civilizations just as good as Europe if not better.

Not to pick on white people, but it's entirely accurate they made our co-existence on this earth a race issue. This developed scorn or dislike they have for blacks continues down to our day.


Listed below are a few of the so-called geniuses who got the ball rolling in pitting white against black.

science failed humanity



Not one ounce of truth could be found in what these early scientists preached as fact. Modern science doesn't agree with them. But guess what? There's still a lot of people who believe in this ridiculous white superiority crap, either conscious or unconsciously, which doesn't say much for the intelligence of these people.


Believe it or not, this is one reason a lot of whites dislike blacks today. It's not rare to hear about media services about blacks being called derogatory names associated with past world history.


science failed humanity


So to honestly answer the question above "Why do many in America dislike black people?" At this point, it's because they want to.



Resources:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a white officer in the Union army had the task of training colored soldiers in the Civil War. He kept a diary for our enjoyment today. (click here)

George W. Williams - History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. (click here)

Europeans Come to Western Africa - (click here)

The Characteristics of the Negro People - (click here)



divider for amazing blacks


Ethel Waters
Count Basie and his band with featured vocalist
Ethel Waters from the film Stage Door Canteen

photo #108-yr-1943

black Movies in America
Movies in America

Eddie Rochester Anderson
Eddie "Rochester" Anderson
photo #103-yr-1937

Jack Benny's radio shows cast
Jack Benny's radio shows cast
photo #104-yr-1937

Dorothy Dandridge
Dorothy Dandridge
photo #102

     Radio / Television / Movies in 1943
  • Hit Parade of 1943 - Dorothy Dandridge (role as Count Basie Band Singer)

  • Happy Go Lucky - Dorothy Dandridge (role as Showgirl)

  • Cabin in the Sky - Lena Horne (musical)

  • Stormy Weather - Lena Horne (musical)

  • Thousands Cheer - Lena Horne (comedy musical film)

  • I Dood It - Lena Horne (comedy musical film)

  • Swing Fever - Lena Horne (comedy musical film)

  • Hit Parade of 1943 - Count Basie (himself)


  • Radio:
  • Starting in the year of 1937, a new funny man would co-star on the Jack Benny Show. This man went by the name of Eddie "Rochester" Anderson. Eddie's character of "Rochester" generated much laughter, becoming immensely popular and would become a household name from 1937 to 1965 in America. The humor on the show was the usual stereotypical stuff that blacks had to endure, but would become a stepping stone for many successful comedians to follow later. Eddie became the first black to have a regular role on a nationwide radio program. The show started on radio and moved to television in 1951 until it went off the air in the 1964-1965 season. Trivia  Anderson was frequently late for the show. Benny attempted to instill punctuality in Anderson by fining him $50 each time he arrived late at the studio. Anderson had a habit of losing track of time, especially when he was talking with someone. Must have had something to say huh Eddie?




divider for amazing blacks


famous black birthdays

Dennis Edwards
Dennis Edwards
photo #103

Paula Kelly
Paula Kelly
photo #104-yr-1976

Leslie Uggams
Leslie Uggams
photo #104-yr-1943

Carol Woods
Carol Woods
photo #105-yr-1943

Don Michael Mitchell
Don Michael Mitchell
photo #106-yr-1943

Barbara Lewis
Barbara Lewis
photo #110-yr-1963

H. Rap Brown
H. Rap Brown
photo #109-yr-2000

Marcelite Jordan Harris
Marcelite Jordan Harris
photo #121-yr-1990

     Famous Birthdays in 1943
  • January 16, 1943 - Major General Marcelite J. Harris  became the first African-American female general officer of the United States Air Force.

  • January 25, 1943 - Ron Van Clief  an African-American martial artist and an actor in Hollywood and Hong Kong action films.

  • February 3, 1943 - Dennis Edwards  an African-American soul and R&B singer, notably a lead singer in The Temptations, on Motown Records.

  • February 9, 1943 - Barbara Lewis an American singer and songwriter whose smooth style influenced rhythm and blues.

  • February 26, 1943 - Bill Duke, Jr.  an African-American actor and film director.

  • March 15, 1943 - Sly Stone  an African American musician, songwriter, leader of the funk group, Sly And The Family Stone.

  • March 17, 1943 - Don Michael Mitchell   was an American actor, best known for appearing with Raymond Burr in the NBC television series Ironside (1967-1975).

  • March 22, 1943 - George Benson  a ten-time Grammy Award-winning African-American musician.

  • May 25, 1943 - Leslie Uggams  an American actress and singer, known for her work in Hallelujah, Baby! and as Kizzy Reynolds in the 1977 television miniseries Roots.

  • August 9, 1943 - Ken Norton  was an American professional boxer who competed from 1967 to 1981, and held the WBC heavyweight title from 1977 to 1978.

  • August 23, 1943 - Victor Moore holds a 10th Degree Black Belt in Karate and was one of the late Robert Trias' Chief instructors of the Shuri-ryu Karate system.

  • September 1, 1943 - Beau M. Billingslea  an American actor and voice actor, known as the voice of Jet Black in the popular anime Cowboy Bebop.

  • September 2, 1943 - Lisle Astor Wilson was an African-American actor known for playing Phillip Woode in Brian De Palma's horror film Sisters and Leonard Taylor on the ABC sitcom That's My Mama.

  • October 4, 1943 - H. Rap Brown was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in the 1960s, and during a short-lived (six months) alliance between SNCC and the Black Panther Party.

  • October 7, 1943 - Austin Stoker  an African-American actor known for his role as Lt. Ethan Bishop on Assault on Precinct 13.

  • October 21, 1943 - Paula Kelly  a dancer and actress in motion pictures, television and theatre.

  • November 13, 1943 - Carol Woods  an African-American actress and singer.

  • December 10, 1943 - Teddy Wilson was an American character actor best known for his recurring role as Sweet Daddy Williams on the CBS sitcom Good Times.

  • 1943 - Edward L. "Buster" Jones was an African-American voice actor.

  • 1943 - Sterling Houston  was an African-American experimental playwright, actor, musician and prose writer renowned for his works of social commentary exploring black and gay identity.



divider for amazing blacks


black american deaths

Robert Nathaniel Dett
Robert Nathaniel Dett
photo #107-yr-1943

Fats Waller
Fats Waller
photo #106-yr-1984

     Famous Deaths in 1943
  • January 5, 1943 - George Washington Carver  was an American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor.

  • September 21, 1943 – Trixie Smith was an African-American blues singer, recording artist, vaudeville entertainer, and actress. She made four dozen recordings.

  • October 2, 1943 - Robert Nathaniel Dett  was a composer in the United States and Canada. During his lifetime he was one of the most successful black composers, known for his use of folk songs and spirituals for choral and piano compositions in the romantic style.

  • November 24, 1943 - Doris "Dorie" Miller was a Messman Third Class in the United States Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the U.S. Navy at the time, after the Medal of Honor.

  • December 15, 1943 - Fats Waller  was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer, whose innovations to the Harlem stride style laid the groundwork for modern jazz piano, and whose best-known compositions, "Ain't Misbehavin'" and "Honeysuckle Rose", were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984 and 1999.

  last words
  George Washington Carver


divider for amazing blacks


famous african american weddings

Marian Anderson
Marian Anderson
photo #104-yr-1955

Sugar Ray Robinson
Sugar Ray Robinson
photo #101-yr-1989

     Famous Weddings in 1943
  • July 17, 1943 - Marian Anderson and Orpheus H. Fisher were married.

  • 1943 - Clarence Cameron White and  Pura Belpré were married.

  • 1943 - Sugar Ray Robinson and  Edna Mae Holly were married.



divider for amazing blacks


famous african american divorces

 Satchel Paige
Satchel Paige
photo #111-yr-1906

     Famous Divorces in 1943
  • August 4, 1943 - Leroy Satchel Paige and Janet Howard were divorced.

  • 1943 - Bill Robinson and Fannie S. Clay were divorced.

  • 1943 - Ella Fitzgerald  and Benjamin Kornegay were divorced.



divider for amazing blacks


juke joints, party for black people
chitlin circuit


lenox club
Lenox Lounge in New York
photo #109-yr-1939

negro green book

The Negro Motorist Green Book was an annual guidebook for African Americans, commonly referred to simply as the "Green Book". It was published from 1936 to 1966, during the Jim Crow era, when discrimination against non-whites was widespread. Middle-class blacks took to driving in part to avoid segregation on public transportation. Blacks employed as salesmen, entertainers and athletes also traveled frequently for work purposes. African American travelers faced a variety of dangers and inconveniences, such as white-owned businesses refusing to serve them or repair their vehicles, being refused accommodation or food by white-owned hotels, and threats of physical violence and forcible expulsion from whites-only "sundown towns". New York mailman and travel agent Victor H. Green published The Negro Motorist Green Book to tackle such problems and "to give the Negro traveler information that will keep him from running into difficulties, embarrassments and to make his trip more enjoyable." The Green Book became "the bible of black travel during Jim Crow." These people were crazy on the for real side! You can bet the Chitlin' Circuit entertainers used the Green Book.

     It's a Party in 1943
    Chitlin' Circuit:
  • Back in the early 1900s because of prejudice and racial discrimination, black entertainers had to be very careful where they traveled. They weren't always welcome in various venues, so they created what's called a Chitlin Circuit. They named it Chitlin Circuit because of blacks typical love for soul food with chitlins being near the top as favorite. So, in other words, they understood there would be love on the circuit. They knew that the clubs, juke joints, theaters, etc. in the circuit were welcoming of the black race and safe to visit. This way of life existing from the early 1900s - 1960s. Noted theaters and entertainers on the circuit included:

    The Fox Theatre in Detroit; the Victory Grill in Austin, Texas; the Carver Theatre in Birmingham, Alabama; the Cotton Club, Small's Paradise and the Apollo Theater in New York City; Robert's Show Lounge, Club DeLisa and the Regal Theatre in Chicago; the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C.;the Royal Peacock in Atlanta; the Royal Theatre in Baltimore; the Uptown Theatre in Philadelphia; the Hippodrome Theatre in Richmond, Virginia; the Ritz Theatre in Jacksonville, Florida; and The Madam C. J. Walker Theatre on Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis.

    Early figures of blues, including Robert Johnson, Son House, Charley Patton, and countless others, traveled the juke joint circuit, scraping out a living on tips and free meals. These entertainers provided much-needed joy and happiness for black folks. Once the band's gig was over, they would leave for the next stop on the circuit. Sounds like a lot of fun and an exciting life!

    Many notable performers worked on the chitlin' circuit, including Patti LaBelle, Count Basie, Hammond B-3, Jeff Palmer, Sam Cooke, Jackie Wilson, Sheila Guyse, Peg Leg Bates, The Supremes, George Benson, James Brown & The Famous Flames, Cab Calloway, Ray Charles, Dorothy Dandridge, Sammy Davis, Jr., Gladys Knight & the Pips, Ella Fitzgerald, The Jackson 5, Redd Foxx, Aretha Franklin, Jimi Hendrix, Billie Holiday, John Lee Hooker, Lena Horne, Etta James, B.B. King, The Miracles, Donna Hightower, Moms Mabley, The Delfonics, Wilson Pickett, Richard Pryor, Otis Redding, Duke Ellington, Dr. Lonnie Smith, Little Richard, Ike & Tina Turner, The Four Tops, Tammi Terrell, The Isley Brothers, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Little Anthony and the Imperials, Muddy Waters, Flip Wilson and Jimmie Walker.


  • chitlin circuit
    Jitterbugging in Negro juke joint,
    Saturday evening, outside Clarksdale, Mississippi

    photo #111-yr-1930

    chitlin circuit
    An African American couple dance the jitterbug in front
    of a crowd. Los Angeles California.

    photo #112-yr-1930



divider for amazing blacks


soul music orgin

soul music

Billie Holiday
Billie Holiday
photo #102-yr-1959

     Music in 1943

  Billboard Top Soul Hits:
  • January 16, 1943: "See See Rider Blues" — Bea Booze

  • January 23, 1943: "What's the Use of Getting Sober" — Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five

  • January 30, 1943: "That Ain't Right" — Nat King Cole Trio

  • February 13, 1943: "Apollo Jump" — Lucky Millinder and His Orchestra

  • March 6, 1943: "Don't Stop Now" — Bonnie Davis

  • March 27, 1943: "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" — The Ink Spots

  • April 24, 1943: "I Can't Stand Losing You" — The Ink Spots

  • May 29, 1943: "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" — Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra

  • August 14, 1943: "Don't Cry Baby" — Erskine Hawkins and His Orchestra

  • September 25, 1943: "A Slip of the Lip" — Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra

  • October 2, 1943: "Sentimental Lady" — Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra

  • November 20, 1943: "All for You" — The Nat King Cole Trio



  Popular Soul Dances:
  • Jitterbug

  • Swing Dance

  • Lindy Hop

  • The Big Apple is both a partner dance and a circle dance that originated in the Afro-American community of the United States in the beginning of the 20th century.

  • The Hully Gully is a type of unstructured line dance often considered to have originated in the sixties, but is also mentioned some forty years earlier as a dance common in the black juke joints in the first part of the twentieth century.

  Musical Happenings in 1943:
  • Doo-wop is a genre of music that was developed in African-American communities in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Baltimore, Newark, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Detroit, Washington D.C and Los Angeles in the 1940s, achieving mainstream popularity in the 1950s and early '60s. Built upon vocal harmony, doo-wop was one of the most mainstream, pop-oriented R&B styles of the time.

  • Swing music, or simply swing, is a form of American music that developed in the early 1930s and became a distinctive style by 1940. The period between 1935 and 1946 is when big band swing music reached its peak and was the most popular music in America. As with jazz, swing was created by African Americans, and its impact on the overall American culture was such that it marked and named an entire era of the United States, the Swing Era.

  • Billie Holiday begins her career with Earl Hines' orchestra.

  • The Clara Ward Singers become a popular success at the National Baptist Convention in Chicago.

  • Dizzy Gillespie leads a jazz quintet at the Manhattan nightspot Onyx Club, introducing bebop to New York City.

  • Duke Ellington begins a series of annual concerts at Carnegie Hall, which make him the "first jazzman to write concert jazz in extended forms.

  • John Lee Hooker arrives in Detroit and begins playing at Brown's Bar. He will soon become the city's most famous bluesman.

  • Stormy Weather is released, soon becoming one of very few all-black musical films. It starred Lena Horne, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Cab Calloway and Fats Waller.



divider for amazing blacks


Thelonious Monk
Fashion styles in the 1940s - Thelonious Monk, Howard McGhee, Roy Eldridge, and Teddy Hill, Minton's Playhouse
New York, N.Y. (Photograph by William P. Gottlieb)

photo #119-yr-1978

Rose McClendon black fashions in 1939
Rose McClendon Fashion Statement
photo #103-yr-1936

Rose McClendon black fashions in 1939
Black Theater Fashion Statement
photo #103-yr-1936

black fashions in 1939
At the juke joint stylin
photo #106-yr-1939

children fashion
Child Fashion
photo #110-yr-1940

mens fashion
Men Fashions in the 40s
photo #111-yr-1940

Eddie South
American jazz violinist Eddie South
with a conk hairdo.

photo #104-yr-1920

Nosy-Be kvinde
Afro Puffs in the 1860s? Absolutely beautiful woman from the island of Nosy-Be, north west Madagascar (1868)
photo #112-yr-1940

     Fashions and Styles in 1943

  Popular Fashions:

  • Men:
    Immediately after the war, men's suits were broad-shouldered and often double-breasted. As wartime restrictions on fabric eased, trousers became fuller, and were usually styled with cuffs (turn-ups). In America, Esquire introduced the "Bold Look", with wide shoulders, broad lapels, and an emphasis on bold, coordinated accessories. Dark charcoal gray was the usual color, and the era of the gray flannel suit was born. Sport coats generally followed the lines of suit coats. Tartan plaids were fashionable in the early 1950s, and later plaids and checks of all types were worn, as were corduroy jackets with leather buttons and car coats. Khaki-colored pants, called chinos, were worn for casual occasions. Some young men wore tight trousers or jeans, leather jackets, and white tee shirts.


  • Women:
    The "New Look" was the style of the 1940s. The signature shape was characterized by a below-mid-calf length, full-skirt, pointed bust, small waist, and rounded shoulder line. The "softness" of the New Look was deceptive; the curved jacket peplum shaped over a high, rounded, curved shoulders, and full skirt of Dior's clothes relied on an inner construction of new interlining materials to shape the silhouette. Throughout the post-war period, a tailored, feminine look was prized and accessories such as gloves and pearls were popular. Tailored suits had fitted jackets with peplums, usually worn with a long, narrow pencil skirt. Day dresses had fitted bodices and full skirts, with jewel or low-cut necklines or Peter Pan collars. At the end of 1945 the demand for nylon stockings was so great that Nylon riots ensued at stores selling the products.


  • Children:
    Due to the baby boom, there was a high demand for clothing for children. Children's clothing began to be made to a higher quality, and some even adopted trends popular with teenagers; many boys started wearing jeans to Elementary school. Many girls' and young women's dresses were styled after those of the older women.


  • Men's Hairstyles:
    The conk, which was derived from congolene, a hair straightener gel made from lye was a hairstyle very popular among African-American men from the 1920s to the 1960s. This hairstyle called for a man with naturally "kinky" hair to have it chemically straightened using a relaxer, sometimes the pure corrosive chemical lye, so that the newly straightened hair could be styled in specific ways. Back in those days, you were cool to have a conk job done.


  • Women's Hairstyles:
    The hot comb was an invention developed in France as a way for women with coarse curly hair to achieve a fine straight look traditionally modeled by historical Egyptian women. However, it was Annie Malone who first patented this tool, while her protégé and former worker, Madam CJ Walker widened the teeth. Today, hot combs are still used by many African-American beauticians and families as an alternative to chemical hair straightening. Many African American and women of other races, still utilize hot combs because this form of straightening is temporary and less damaging to the hair if done properly.


  • Braiding Hairstyles:
    Historically, hair braiding was not a paid trade. Since the African diaspora, in the 20th and 21st centuries it has developed as a multi-million dollar business in such regions as the United States and western Europe. An individual's hair groomer was usually someone whom they knew closely. Sessions included shampooing, oiling, combing, braiding, and twisting, plus adding accessories.




divider for amazing blacks


black pullman porter

black pullman porter

Pullman porters, who were primarily black, are widely credited with contributing to the development of the black middle class in America. Before the Civil War, sleeping cars were not in use. George Pullman came up with the brilliant idea of making rail travel a memorable event with servers to cater to whites every need.

During slavery, most whites didn't own slaves, and this gave them an opportunity to experience that. Pullman became the number #1 employer of blacks in the country. He was a tight businessman though because the pay was lousy with the porters working over 400 hours a month. Porters also had to purchase their clothing and accessories. They received most of their income by tips.

But the job was steady work and that meant alot for black families. Famous porters of old included, Thurgood Marshall, Oscar Micheaux, Malcolm X and the photojournalist Gordon Parks.



divider for amazing blacks


Mary McLeod Bethune
Mary McLeod Bethune, "Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt and others at the opening of
Midway Hall, one of two residence halls built by the Public Buildings Administration of
FWA for Negro government girls. 1943
photo #105-yr-1875

United States Census for Negroes
United States Census for African Americans
in the 1940s

Pepsi Cola
Pepsi Cola
photo #111-yr-1903

Our Community in 1943

Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:

  • 1940s - The Pepsi Cola company begins. Trivia: Originally created and developed by pharmacist Caleb Bradham in 1893 and introduced as Brad's Drink, it was later renamed Pepsi-Cola on August 28, 1898. Bradham put the drink on the market in 1903. In the 1940s, President of Pepsi Walter Mack noticed that blacks were not being represented in advertising for soft drinks. He felt these were untapped dollars that Pepsi should capitalize. At this same time Coke had a reluctance to hire blacks. So Mack hired an all black advertising team headed by Hennan Smith, who was an advertising executive "from the Negro newspaper field." Henna portrayed blacks in a very positive light in his ads, and Mack's intuition was correct, Pepsi's sales skyrocketed, even beating Coke for the first time in Chicago. But here's the sad news. Pepsi was becoming very popular, and the white affiliates of the soft drink company didn't want it associated with black people, resulting in President Walter Mack making the following statement:

    "We don't want it to become known as a nigger drink."

    After Mack left the company in 1950, support for the black sales team faded and it was sadly cut. Of course, that was many years ago, and I won't be thinking about it the next time I pop open a can, but it's just good to know your history.

  • The United States Population is 131,669,275 with a total of 12,865,518 being African Americans.



divider for amazing blacks


african americans and religion


How did religion begin for the American Negro?

Well, it was an exciting journey for sure, but as usual, we have to go back into history for the likely answer. Before arriving in America as slaves, generally speaking, our ancestors practiced a religion which included fetishism.

What is fetishism you may ask?


 Traditional  Benin Voodoo Dance
Traditional Benin Voodoo Dance

Fetishism is a man-made object (such as the doll aound the lady's neck in the picture) that is thought to have power over others. Africans were extremely superstitious in their native land.

But once exposed to religious teachers in America, quickly left their superstitious past behind them, and would frown upon new arrivals of Africans who practiced fetishism in religion.

In Europe, the Roman Catholic Church had lost their grip on people with their questionable religious practices. There were many who thought the Church was wrong and formed a protest or a Protestant Reformation that resulted in the creation of tons of different religions with their doctrines and teachings claiming to be Christian.


Religion definition:
A religion is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems,
and world views that relate humanity to an order of existence.



Episcopal, Jesuits, Methodists, Protestant, Anglican, Lutheranism, Calvinism, Presbyterianism, Wesleyanism were all against Roman Catholic teachings.

But there would be a new religion on the horizon for humanity that went by the name of science. The introduction of science was in many ways entirely different than Christianity because it taught man to believe and rely on himself and his creations, rather than on a Supreme Being he couldn't see.

Faith is something foreign and unbelievable to a scientist. Also, this new form of religion would give these believers complete moral authority to do as they wished without a guilty conscience or retribution from a Surpreme Being.

This is what made slavery right or moral in the eyes of so many whites because new science taught that whites were superior and blacks inferior. The theory of evolution is another example in clear teaching that the world exists because of a big bang instead of being created, and also man evolved from apes rather than being created.

Do you believe in Evolution? If so, evolution is your religion because mainstream religion and evolution just don't jive, it's either one or the other.

During slavery, most of the first black congregations and churches were founded by free blacks, but slaves learned about Christianity by attending services led by a white preacher or supervised by a white person. Slaveholders often held prayer meetings at their plantations. Methodist and Baptist were the preferred choices of slaves because of its message.

But after slavery blacks were still restricted in the white churches so what they did next is not a surprise. They began to form their churches free from white rulership and exclusion, but kept the doctrine and teachings, but of course with a more lively twist (singing and dancing). It's clear they still had African culture in their hearts. This would mark the beginning of a new American creation, the black church.


The following is a very brief history of religion in Black America:


Pentacostal -
 Pentacostal Movement
    William Seymour
William J. Seymour - photo#111-yr-2015

Charles Fox Parham an independent holiness evangelist who believed strongly in divine healing, was an important figure in the emergence of Pentecostalism as a distinct Christian movement. But it wasn't until one of his black students named William J. Seymour learned these teaching and took it back to California with him that the Pentecostal movement took off like wildfire.

Seymour's preaching sparked the famous three-year-long Azusa Street Revival in 1906. Worship at the racially integrated Azusa Mission featured an absence of any order of service. (whites would later dislike this) People preached and testified as moved by the Spirit, spoke and sung in tongues, and fell in the Spirit. Blacks whites and other races would attend these services. But there was a matter of Jim Crow to be kept in mind that made it illegal for blacks and whites to mix.

So whites broke away from Seymour and began their Pentecostal churches. It's a fact that the beginning of the widespread Pentecostal movement in the United States is considered to have started with one-eyed black preacher William J. Seymour's Azusa Street Revival.




The Church Of God in Christ (COGIC) -
 The Church Of God in Christ baptism
Church Of God in Christ Baptism
photo#112-yr-2015

The Church Of God in Christ was formed in 1897 by a group of disfellowshiped Baptists, most notably Charles Price Jones (1865–1949) and Charles Harrison Mason (1866–1961) and is a Pentecostal Christian denomination with a predominantly African-American membership. It ranks as the largest Pentecostal denomination and the fifth largest Christian denomination in the U.S. Evangelical Baptist, and Methodist preachers traveled throughout the South in the Great Awakening of the late 18th century and appealed directly to slaves, and a few thousand slaves converted. Early COGIC leaders were very much attracted by the Pentecostal message and would break from the Baptist for this reason.



A.M.E. Church -
The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the A.M.E. Church, is a predominantly African-American Methodist denomination based in the US. It is the oldest independent Protestant denomination founded by blacks in the world. It was founded by the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816 from several black Methodist congregations in the mid-Atlantic area that wanted independence from white Methodists.



Baptists -
Baptists are individuals who comprise a group of denominations and churches that subscribe to a doctrine that baptism should be performed only for professing believers (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism) and that it must be done by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling). Other tenets of Baptist churches include soul competency (liberty), salvation through faith alone, Scripture alone as the rule of faith and practice, and the autonomy of the local congregation. Baptists recognize two ministerial offices, pastors, and deacons. Baptist churches are widely considered to be Protestant churches, though some Baptists disavow this identity.



Islam -
An adherent of Islam is called a Muslim. Jews felt like they were chosen people who were promised a land filled with milk and honey, a holy land. This promise was made to Abraham and his seed. Abraham's wife Sarah had trouble conceiving children so to keep the promise alive and in the family she chose Hagar who was an Egyptian handmaid to have sexual relations with Abraham to bear a son, which is what they did. This son's name was Ishmael.

But something happened later that would throw things into a tizzy. At a very old age Sarah was now able to have kids and bore a son named Isaac.

Now here's the problem. Does the promise belong to Sarah's son or Hagar's son? Sarah felt it belonged to her bloodline, so she sent Hagar and Ishmael into the wilderness for them to die. But guess what? They didn't die. Muhammad who was the final prophet sent by God as identified in the Quran was born within Ishmael's seed line.

So even to this day these two groups don't care for each other.




Science -
This religion by far has proven to be the most destructive for humankind. Its users have created a world of me, me, me, by magnifying themselves, sincerely believing they are all of that and a bag of chips. Also the belief that spirited competition is healthy and useful. Win at all cost! The survival of the fittest theory. Many genocides were accomplished in the name of science. It teaches us that man originates from apes, (many blacks lost their life because of this false teaching) the earth was created from nothing and in essence humans are their gods. The bad far outweighs the good with the practice of science. Just look around.


divider for amazing blacks


RESOURCES:


Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License

#100 -   Public Domain images - Washington, D.C. March, 1943. Jewel Mazique, Negro federal worker employed in the Library of Congress 50 photographic prints. | Photographs show Washington, D.C. Jewel Mazique, black federal worker employed by the Library of Congress. At work, eating lunch in cafeteria, going home. Shopping with husband, Edward C. Mazique. Reading to and playing piano with nieces. Attending union meetings. Giving blood for Red Cross blood bank. Speaking in church. Contributor: Collier, John Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1943

#101 -   Public Domain images - Frances Benjamin Johnston [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#102 -   Public Domain images - By not listed (Tuskegee University Archives/Museum) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103 -   Public Domain images - By Bernie Ilson, Inc. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#104 -   Public Domain images -By William Morris Agency (management) (ebay item frontback) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#105 -   Public Domain images - By U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kyle D. Gahlau [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#106 -   Public Domain images - See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#107 -   Public Domain images - By Unattributed [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#108 -   Public Domain images - By Film screenshot (Stage Door Canteen film) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#109 -   Public Domain images - By Charles Henry Alston, 1907-1977, Artist (NARA record: 3569253) (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#110 -   Public Domain images - By Arthur S. Siegel (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8d13572/) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#111 -   Public Domain images -By Photographer not credited. (Via [1].) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#112 -   Public Domain images - By Darwinek at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia by SreeBot) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#113 -   Public Domain images - By Darwinek at en.wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia by SreeBot) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons



#114 -   Public Domain images - https://pixabay.com/en/divorce-separation-marriage-breakup-619195/

#115 -   Public Domain images - By Delaywaves (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#116 -   Public Domain images - By Bill Faulk (Scan of original documents in collection of author) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#117 -   Public Domain images -
https://pixabay.com/en/negro-man-spectacles-african-156005/


About Copyright
If you have any more information about an item you've seen on our website or if you are the copyright owner and believe our website has not properly attributed your work to you or has used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please email admin@amazingblacks.com with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

Terms of Use    Privacy Policy
divider for amazing blacks