blast from the past

blast from the past
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annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1872:
Governor P. B. S. Pinchback
    Pinckney Benton Stewart (aka) P. B. S. Pinchback was born a free man on May 10, 1837. His mother Eliza Stewart was a freed slave, and his father was a white planter and his mother's master. So this meant his dad was his master/dad or dad/master (strange indeed). His father, William Pinchback took full advantage of his master status having Eliza as his mistress and Mrs. Pinchback as his white wife with whom he also had a family.

    The father never denied Pinckney and sent him to the best schools. The father died when Pinckney was 11 years old and Eliza, fearing the Pinchback would try and make them slaves fled to Ohio with the family.

    Later during the Civil War, Pinckney decided to fight on the side of the Union. Commissioned a captain, Pinckney was one of the Union Army's few commissioned officers of African-American ancestry. Pinckney was routinely passed over for promotions for the white officers. He finally had enough and resigned his commission in 1863.

    It was at this point his sister wrote him a letter saying;
    If I were you, Pink, I would not let my ambition die. I would seek to rise and not in that class either but I would take my position in the world as a white man as you are and let the other go for be assured of this as the other you will never get your rights...

    At the end of the war, Pinckney and his wife moved to Alabama, to test their freedom as full citizens. Racial tensions during Reconstruction resulted in shocking levels of violence as whites tried to re-establish social dominance and suppress black voting. Stewart then decided to return with his family to New Orleans, Louisiana.

    In New Orleans, Pinckney became active in the Republican Party, and by 1868 was elected as a State Senator. In 1871 Pinckney succeeded to the position as acting lieutenant governor upon the death of Oscar Dunn, the first elected African-American lieutenant governor of a U.S. state.

    During 1872 the incumbent Republican governor, Henry Clay Warmoth was going through impeachment proceedings because of disputed election returns and had to step aside until the procedure were over, which made Pinckney acting Governor of the state from December 9, 1872, and served for about six weeks until the end of Warmoth's term.

    In 1885, Pinckney studied law in New Orleans at Straight University, a historically black college later known as Dillard University. He was admitted to the Louisiana bar in 1886 but never practiced. Pinckney would continue to be active in the African-American community.

    Even though his term as Governor was brief, he was the first and blazed the way for other men such as Douglas Wilder, Deval Patrick, and David Paterson, and without a doubt more to follow. We now know it's possible.

    If you look at P. B. S. Pinchback's picture, it's very obvious he could have passed for white like his sister was evidently doing all of her life, but he chose to stay and fight the battle right next to the lowly Negro.

    What a man! How many can say they would have done the same? We admire you and your inspiring story Governor P. B. S. Pinchback and award you for the same year you became the first black Governor of the United States, with the 1872 Hamite Award which is given to exemplary American citizens who have set an excellent example for all to follow.

P. B. S. Pinchback
P. B. S. Pinchback
photo #106-yr-1872





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How were blacks feeling in 1872?
happy mood of blacks
The excitement is still in the air even with the craziness going on in the South with all of that unnecessary violence. We just hope people come to their senses and obey the laws of the land so we all can live together peacefully. We have always been a loving, peaceful people, but whenever you hear of someone getting killed or murdered, 99% of the time it's the whites doing it to the blacks. We are like helpless sheep. I think they are afraid of our dark skin. But as usual, we have hope.

The Freedmen Bureau was an excellent resource for us, but sadly dismantled by Congress this year. What are we gonna do now? We heard the news about one of our own Charlotte Ray who was the first African-American female lawyer in the United States, graduating from Howard University School of Law. By this one accomplishment alone, proves we can achieve if we just had opportunity and brotherly support.



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african american first

 For the year 1872:
  • John H. Conyers was the first African-American midshipman admitted to the United States Naval Academy.

  • P. B. S. Pinchback was the first African-American governor of Louisiana (non-elected).

  • Frederick Douglass was the first African-American nominee for Vice President of the United States by the Equal Rights Party.



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black people shooting marbles

Octavius Catto
Octavius Valentine Catto
photo #121-yr-1863


Octavius Valentine Catto


     Sports in 1872
    Trivia:
  • Blacks were not accepted into the league baseball games, so they started their teams, becoming professional by the the 1870s. The first known baseball game between two black teams was held on November 15, 1859, in New York City. The Henson Base Ball Club of Jamaica, Queens, defeated the Unknowns of Weeksville, Brooklyn, 54 to 43.

    By the end of the 1860s, the black baseball mecca was Philadelphia, which had an African-American population of 22,000. Two former cricket players, James H. Francis and Francis Wood, formed the Pythian Base Ball Club. They played in Camden, New Jersey, at the landing of the Federal Street Ferry, because it is hard to get permits for black baseball games in the city. Octavius Catto, the promoter of the Pythians, decided to apply for membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players, generally a matter of sending delegates to the annual convention; beyond that, a formality.

    At the end of the 1867 season "the National Association of Baseball Players voted to exclude any club with a black player." In some ways Blackball thrived under segregation, with the few black teams of the day playing not only each other but white teams as well. "Black teams earned the bulk of their income playing white independent 'semipro' clubs."


  • The mistreatment and segregation of Blacks didn't only happen in the South, but also the Northern cities like Philadelphia.



  • Octavius Valentine Catto was a black educator, intellectual, and civil rights activist in Philadelphia. As a man, he also became known as a top cricket and black baseball pioneer in 19th-century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.



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african immigrants out-perform other ethnic groups


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Freedmen's school
The Misses Cooke's school room, Freedman's Bureau, Richmond, VA.
photo #109-yr-1866

Freedmen's school
Freedmen's school?, South Carolina. African-American children, mainly girls, with adult women, possibly teachers.
photo #100-yr-1865


Freedmen's Bureau School


     Reconstruction in 1872
    Freedmen's Bureau:
    The Freedmen's Bureau began in 1865. Its purpose was to assist former black slaves from a life of slavery to the free labor system. The Bureau provided assistance in medical needs, housing, food, school and also legal aid. The Bureau helped people find lost family and taught them to read and write so they could better themselves. Oliver Otis Howard who was a Union general, was appointed the commissioner of the bureau in May 1865.

    You have to remember during slavery days it was illegal in many states to teach blacks to read and write, so the Freedmen's Bureau had their hands full in assisting these illiterate former slaves into the American mainstream. They're many corrupt and insincere Bureau agents who along with white Southerners fought against Bureau successes every step of the way, but they are also honest Bureau officials who wanted to help and assist blacks in bettering themselves.

    Congress realized the Bureau was needed for a longer period of time and sought to extend it with opposition from white Southerners and a powerful new ally, President, Andrew Johnson who vetoed the bill because he felt the Bureau showed preference to one race over another and wouldn't help in making blacks independent.

    Andrew Johnson didn't care for blacks. He gave former Confederates back their land lost in the war and fired Bureau agents he felt were too partial to the black cause. It was like Johnson was saying to the South, "OK we fought a war and it's over, but we are not going to let a Negro tear us apart, it's time to heal. Screw the Negro! We whites have to stick together! He also was against every bill that came to his desk that would help blacks. His veto was later overridden by Congress, and the Bureau was extended a while longer, but not for long because it was dismantled by Congress in 1872.

    After the Bureau shut down, and with some political setbacks for Republicans who were sympathetic to the black cause, Negroes were left to fend for themselves. But in an extraordinary display of unity and devotion to a common thread, the North and South put aside their differences to protect their shared interest, which was the union of the United States which meant for them wealth and prosperity in their pursuit of happiness, clothed in white skin under the banner of distorted American principles with the exclusion of the Negro from both North and South. WHEW! That's a Negro mouthful, but true. This display of unity and exclusion would hopefully serve future blacks well to learn from.

    Why had American principles become distorted?

    Even before slavery formally began, American principle stated "all men are created equal" and had a right to the pursuit of personal happiness. Slavery goes against American principles and the two can't co-exist. Abraham Lincoln himself was quoted as saying, "If slavery isn't wrong, then nothing is wrong" and to his credit and vision for a United and Strong America, the Reconstruction Amendments were introduced.

    But laws have microscopic power over the motivations of a person's heart. White unprincipled Southerners didn't even attempt to join the new American spirit of things, aligning themselves as proud anti-American just as they had done by trying to secede in the Civil War. They fought tooth and nail against equality for the Negro.

    During slavery, the dependence on free black labor had transformed these money-hungry, greedy white Southerners into a hateful white SLAVE POWER who had to be stopped at all cost. This Slave Power wanted to expand slavery to new territories, but the North took a stand, and this is what started the Civil War, not because Lincoln had a burning desire to free the slaves.

    President Lincoln understood the motives of the Slave Power were against American principles and fought the war because of it.

    OH MIGHTY, MIGHTY SLAVE POWER you have indeed caused alot of pain and misery! Crazy terrorist maniac, didn't your mama teach you better?

greedy white southerners
Has A True and Principled America Simply Become An Idea
That's Too Lofty For Human Beings To Follow?


The Repulsive Slave Power That Was Intertwined With Slavery,
Along With it's Peoples and Racist Beliefs Were Wounded in The Civil War,
But Not Completely Destroyed, And Were Allowed To Thrive.
Would This Come Back To Haunt America With Bad Race Relations,
Between It's Black and White American Citizens?


only time will tell my friends


Oliver Otis Howard
Oliver Otis Howard, commissioner of The Freedmen's Bureau
photo#111-yr-1866
Trivia: Howard University was named for General Oliver Otis Howard, who was both the founder of the University and, at the time, Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. Howard later served as President of the university from 1869–74.

annual hamite award
Susie Taylor
photo #104- yr-1864

Carpetbagger
Carpetbagger
photo #100-yr-1865

annual hamite award
Hiram Rhodes Revels
photo#110-yr-1870

    Now with the re-building of America at hand and much money to be made, who would profit? Previously the North had noble motives in helping these millions of former slaves transition into the mainstream but after political losses and resistance from white Southerners they eventually aligned themselves with these unprincipled anti-Americans because of skin color and shared money interest and ignored the continued assistance needed in helping their black skin brothers.

    With the dismantlement of the Freedmen's Bureau, America officially had over four million black nomads attempting to find their way in a hostile and prejudice land. Well at least the North could say they tried if this would soothe the conscience. This time in history was the foundation for future race relations, and a good solid foundation was not laid. The North gave up the fight too quickly and passed a terrible situation to future generations.

    By now we're sure the Negro has to wonder to himself if America is being undermined and distorted at this point in history? Is something shady going on? Abraham Lincoln understood how this could happen and lost his life attempting to protect real justice, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all Americans.


    How Were Former Slaves Feeling At This Time In History?

    Please consider a quote from a person who was there. Susie Taylor, our 1864 Hamite Award winner.

    "For two hundred years we had toiled for them; the war of 1861 came and was ended, and we thought our race was forever freed from bondage, and that the two races could live in unity with each other, but when we read almost every day of what is being done to my race by some whites in the South, I sometimes ask, "Was the war in vain? Has it brought freedom, in the full sense of the word, or has it not made our condition more hopeless?"


    Carpetbaggers:
    Carpetbaggers were mostly well-educated, middle-class white Northerners who were called Carpetbaggers because of the fancy luggage most carried. Carpetbaggers would travel to areas of the south to assist in the rebuilding during and after the civil war. (1865-1877)

    They assisted the abolitionists in teaching former black slaves to read and write among other things. White Southerners didn't like carpetbaggers because they felt they were money hungry and greedy opportunist, which in many cases were true.

    Many carpet baggers would buy former plantations at low prices and hire black workers to turn a profit, and was also involved in the politics of rebuilding the south.


    Hiram Rhodes Revels was elected as the first African American to serve in the United States Senate. Revels denounced the carpetbaggers for manipulating the black vote for personal benefit, and for keeping alive wartime hatreds...

    "Since reconstruction, the masses of my people have been, as it were, enslaved in mind by unprincipled adventurers, who, caring nothing for the country, were willing to stoop to anything no matter how infamous, to secure power to themselves, and perpetuate it."


    Abolitionists:
    Abolitionists were no nonsense type of people who recognized injustice and wanted swift action taken to remedy the wrong. They had been around during the American Revolution but became stronger in voice and influence during 1830 - 1870, becoming involved with the Northern churches and politics.

    Abolitionists were whites and blacks who hated slavery and wanted it immediately outlawed. Other anti-slavery movements sought a gradual change from slavery to freedom, or to restrict slavery in parts of the United States and prevent it from spreading further.

    Free African-Americans (before the Emancipation Proclamation) also played a role in the movement, but enslaved blacks such as Harriet Tubman had a more dangerous mission for fear of getting caught and punished and very possibly killed.





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Education of Slaves
Education of Slaves
photo #105-yr-1865

     Education in 1872
  • September 21, 1872 - John Henry Conyers of South Carolina becomes the first black student admitted to the United States Naval Academy.

  • 1872 - School attendance on the rise for African-Americans.

  • 1872 - In the Reconstruction era, with carpetbaggers, mission societies, along with The Freedmen’s Bureau opened 1,000 schools across the South for black children. Schooling was a high priority for the Freedmen, and the enrollments were high and enthusiastic.

  • Paul Quinn College is oldest historically black college west of the Mississippi River. The college was founded in 1872 in Austin, Texas by a small group of African Methodist Episcopal preachers at Metropolitan A.M.E. Church.



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 Ulysses Grant
Ulysses Grant
photo #107-yr-1869

P. B. S. Pinchback
P. B. S. Pinchback became the first African-American Governor in the United States
photo #106

Democratic donkey
Nast cartoon of Democratic donkey, from "Harper's Weekly", January 19th 1870
photo #112-yr-1870


Ulysses S. Grant | 60-Second Presidents | PBS


     Political Scene in 1872
  • 1872 - Ulysses S. Grant was the 18th President of the United States (1869–77). As Commanding General, Grant worked closely with President Abraham Lincoln to lead the Union Army to victory over the Confederacy in the American Civil War. He implemented Congressional Reconstruction, often at odds with Lincoln's successor, Andrew Johnson. Analysis: Ulysses S. Grant was a President that understood and enforced the U.S. Constitution. He lobbied for the 15th Amendment, giving blacks the right to vote. He was also a strong believer in Reconstruction Aid and Civil Rights to the Negro, opposite of his predecessor, Andrew Johnson.


  • The cartoons of Thomas Nast 1870 in Harper's Weekly. Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the Republicans.


ooOoo


African Americans in Office 1870–1876
State State Legislator U.S. Senators U.S. Congressmen
Alabama 69 0 4
Arkansas 8 0 0
Florida 30 0 1
Georgia 41 0 1
Louisiana 87 0 1*
Mississippi 112 2 1
North Carolina 30 0 1
South Carolina 190 0 6
Tennessee 1 0 6
Texas 19 0 0
Virginia 46 0 0
Total 633 2 15




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famous african american birthdays

William Monroe Trotter
William Monroe Trotter
photo #100

Matilda Evans, M.D.
Matilda Evans, M.D.
photo #103-yr-1872

Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller
Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller
photo #107-yr-1872

 Paul Laurence Dunbar
Paul Laurence Dunbar
photo #110-yr-1906

Bill
William Manuel "Bill" Johnson
photo #108-yr-1872

Sutton Elbert Griggs
Sutton Elbert Griggs
photo #107-yr-1933


Paul Laurence Dunbar


     Famous Birthdays in 1872
  • April 7, 1872 - William Monroe Trotter was a newspaper editor and real estate businessman based in Boston, Massachusetts, and an activist for African-American civil rights.

  • May 13, 1872 - Matilda Evans, M.D.  was the first African-American woman licensed to practice medicine in South Carolina and an advocate for improved health care for African Americans, particularly children.

  • June 19, 1872 - Sutton Elbert Griggs was an African-American author, Baptist minister, and social activist. He is best known for his novel Imperium in Imperio, a utopian work that envisions a separate African-American state within the United States.


  • June 27, 1872 - Paul Laurence Dunbar  was an African-American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  • August 10, 1872 - William Manuel "Bill" Johnson was an American jazz musician, considered the father of the "slap" style of Double bass playing.

  • August 11, 1872 - Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller  was a pioneering African-American psychiatrist who made significant contributions to the study of Alzheimer's disease.

  • August 18, 1872 - Elizabeth Evelyn Wright   founded Denmark Industrial Institute in Denmark, South Carolina, as a school for African-American youth. It is present-day Voorhees College, a historically black college (HBCU). She was a humanitarian and educator, founding several schools for black children.

  • September 8, 1872 - Ionia Rollin Whipper  was an African American obstetrician and public health outreach worker. A 1903 graduate of Howard University School of Medicine, she was one of the few African-American women physicians of her generation.

  • October 3, 1872 - Geraldine Louise ("Deenie") Pindell  was the wife of William Monroe Trotter who was a newspaper editor and real estate businessman based in Boston, Massachusetts, and an activist for African-American civil rights.



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famous african american deaths

Osborne Perry Anderson
Osborne Perry Anderson
photo #100

Jermain Wesley Loguen
Jermain Wesley Loguen
photo #102




Robert Djed Snead as the Rev. J.W. Loguen


     Famous Deaths in 1872
  • September 30, 1872 - Jermain Wesley Loguen was an African-American abolitionist and bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.

  • December 21, 1872 - Robert Seldon Duncanson was an African-American painter associated with the Hudson River School.

  • 1872 - Osborne Perry Anderson was an African-American abolitionist and the only surviving African-American member of John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, and later a soldier in the Union army of the American Civil War.

  • 1872 - James D. Lynch was the first African-American Secretary of State of Mississippi, and a minister.



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soul music orgin


Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
photo #102-yr-1876

Callender's Colored Minstrels
Plantation scenarios were common in black minstrelsy, as shown here in this poster for Callender's Colored Minstrels.
photo #109-yr-1875

Thomas Wentworth Higginson
During the Civil War, Thomas Wentworth Higginson served as colonel of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, the first federally authorized black regiment, from 1862–1864. Following the war, Higginson devoted much of the rest of his life to fighting for the rights of freed slaves, women and other disfranchised peoples.
photo #118-yr-1863

John Brown Song
John Brown Song
photo #119-yr-1863


John Brown's Song



Duke University Professor Thomas F. DeFrantz: Buck, Wing and Jig



Danny 'Slapjazz' Barber and Sekani Thomas: An Apprenticeship in Hambone (aka Patting Juba)


     Music in 1872

  Musical Happenings in 1872:
  • The 1870s was a decade where the only way to obtain music was on sheet music sold in stores. People would sit at the piano and sing.


  • Theodore Seward begins publishing his arrangements of African American spirituals, in book form like a hymnal, with his publication of Jubilee Songs As Sung by the Jubilee Singers of Fisk University, a collection of spirituals from the repertoire of the Fisk University Jubilee Singers. That group rises to fame in this year after a highly successful concert in Boston during the World's Peace Jubilee and International Musical Festival, the first time African American "singers (are) included in a big musical production" in the country.


  • One or two African-American troupes dominated the scene for much of the late 1860s and 1870s. The first of these was Brooker and Clayton's Georgia Minstrels, who played the Northeast around 1865. Sam Hague's Slave Troupe of Georgia Minstrels formed shortly after that and toured England with great success beginning in 1866. In the 1870s, white entrepreneurs bought most of the successful black companies. Charles Callender obtained Sam Hague's troupe in 1872 and renamed it Callender's Georgia Minstrels. They became the most famous black troupe in America, and the words Callender and Georgia came to be synonymous with the institution of black minstrelsy.


  • Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield dubbed "The Black Swan", was an African-American singer considered the best-known black concert artist of her time. She was noted by James M. Trotter for her "remarkably sweet tones and wide vocal compass". She toured and conducted a Philadelphia music studio. Among her voice pupils was Thomas Bowers, who became known as "The Colored Mario" and "The American Mario" for the similarity of his voice to Italian opera tenor Giovanni Mario.



  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson:
  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson leads the First South Carolina Colored Volunteers, the first group of authorized African American soldiers. Higginson is a notable author who helps popularize many aspects of African American music. He contributed to the preservation of Negro spirituals by copying dialect verses and music he heard sung around the regiment's campfires.


  • John Brown's Song:
  • is a United States marching song about the abolitionist John Brown. The song was popular in the Union during the American Civil War.


  • "Juba Juba", a popular song about the Juba:

    Juba dis and Juba dat,
    and Juba killed da yellow cat,
    You sift the meal and ya gimme the husk,
    you bake the bread and ya gimme the crust,
    you eat the meat and ya gimme the skin,
    and that's the way,
    my mama's troubles begin


    A song about the hambone from Step it Down (v.s.):

    Hambone Hambone pat him on the shoulder
    If you get a pretty girl, I'll show you how to hold her.
    Hambone, Hambone, where have you been?
    All 'round the world and back again.
    Hambone, Hambone, what did you do?
    I got a train and I fairly flew.
    Hambone, Hambone where did you go?
    I hopped up to Miss Lucy's door.
    I asked Miss Lucy would she marry me.
    (falsetto)"Well I don't care if Papa don't care!"
    First come in was Mister Snake,
    He crawled all over that wedding cake.
    Next walked in was Mister Tick,
    He ate so much it made him sick.
    Next walked in was Mister Coon,
    We asked him to sing us a wedding tune,
    Now Ham-....
    Now Ham....



  Popular Soul Dances:
  • The Juba or Hambone dance was originally from West Africa. It became an African-American plantation dance that was performed by slaves during their gatherings when no rhythm instruments were allowed due to fear of secret codes hidden in the drumming.

  • Virginia Essence

  • Buck & Wing

  • Tap Dancing

  • Soft Shoe

  • Jig Dancing



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Young African American woman, full-length portrait, standing
Fashions for young African American women
photo #103-yr-1870

Young African American woman, full-length portrait, standing
Fashions for young African American women
photo #103a-yr-1870

Unidentified African American man
Stylish clothes for African American men
photo #107-yr-1870

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly The person who drew this Illustration was kind to black people. Usually during that time period they would portray the Negro with wild hair and humongous noses with exaggerated lips. They made us look normal. Thank you Harper's.
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869


1800's Fashion Show


     Fashions in 1872

  Popular Fashions:

  • For women by 1870, fullness in the skirt had moved to the rear, where elaborately draped overskirts were held in place by tapes and supported by a bustle. This fashion required an underskirt, which was heavily trimmed with pleats, flounces, rouching, and frills.


  • Innovations in men's fashion of the 1870s included the acceptance of patterned or figured fabrics for shirts and the general replacement of neckties tied in bow knots with the four-in-hand and later the Ascot tie.

  • Infants continued to be dressed in flowing gowns, a style that continued into the early twentieth century. Gender dress changes often did not occur until a child was five or six. As the girls got older, they wore longer skirts. A four-year-old would wear her skirt at knee length; ten to twelve at mid-calf; and by sixteen, the girls dress would be ankle length. Boys often dressed similar to adult males, as they too wore blazers and Norfolk jackets.



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why do many dislike white people


“Ignorance of how we are shaped racially is the first sign of privilege. In other words. It is a privilege to ignore the consequences of race in America.” Tim Wise


How did it begin?

Actually, it's a worldwide negative perception of whites, but why? Well, a quick and simple trip back in history will get the probable answer.

The best way to describe European history would be wars, wars, and more wars.

good white americans
The Europeans wanted better and pursued a life of civilization as opposed to barbarism. They discovered a tool that would help them with that. It was called Science, which was a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. In other words, every single thing would be studied and scrutinized.

Foolishly, church leaders of that day welcomed science, but it would eventually become a direct enemy of humanity's maker.

Why so?

Because science would teach the ordinary person to believe in themselves and the intellectual powers, they possess as opposed to an All Mighty Creator. Because the Creator of the universe is mathematically correct, once these early scientists were able to figure equations for themselves in regards to nature, they felt there were like a god. Science would also teach the world to exist because of a Big Bang theory and evolution, instead of being created.

Did these early Europeans belief in science affect the Negro?

Absolutely! It affected all tribal nature human beings. Whites collectively proclaimed themselves superior and this is where the trouble started for the rest of humankind. The Europeans were much smarter and more advanced than tribal communities. Millions of Negroes and other races lost their lives and suffered much because of science.

Before slavery, the Negro had been isolated from the rest of the world for many years due to the humongous Sahara Desert to the North and the Arab slave traders to the East made it tough if not impossible to travel. They weren't able to share in the new learning discoveries the world were experiencing. These people were a group lost in time, away from the modern world.

good black americans

Once the Portuguese got the slave trade started with the entire world, the scientist had an opportunity to scrutinize and evaluate the lowly Negro, and I have to warn you right now it wasn't pretty.

why do many dislike white people
An illustration from the influential American magazine Harper's Weekly shows an alleged similarity between "Irish Iberian" and "Negro" features in contrast to the higher "Anglo-Teutonic." The accompanying caption reads "The Iberians are believed to have been originally an African race, which thousands of years ago spread themselves through Spain over Western Europe. Their remains are found in the barrows, or burying places, in various parts of these countries. The skulls are of a small prognathous type. They came to Ireland and mixed with the natives of the South and West, who themselves are supposed to have been of small type and descendants of savages of the Stone Age, who, in consequence of isolation from the rest of the world, had never been out-competed in the healthy struggle of life, and thus made way, according to the laws of nature, for superior races."  (this is an Harper's Weekly assessment of race, not ours) photo#101-yr-2015


The following excerpts are scientist views of the Negro back then:

Charles White (1728–1813), an English physician and surgeon, believed that races occupied different stations in the "Great Chain of Being," and he tried to scientifically prove that human races have distinct origins from each other. He believed that Whites and Negroes were two different species. White was a believer in polygeny, the idea that different races had been created separately.

Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) was a German philosopher who said "The yellow Indians do have a little talent. The Negroes are far below them, and at the lowest point are a part of the American people".

Franz Ignaz Pruner (1808–1882) was a medical doctor who studied the racial structure of Negroes in Egypt. In a book which he wrote in 1846, he claimed that Negro blood had a negative influence on the Egyptian moral character. He argued that the main feature of the Negro's skeleton is prognathism, which he claimed was the Negro's relation to the ape. He also argued that Negroes had very similar brains to apes and that Negros have a shortened big toe, which is a characteristic connecting Negroes closely to apes.

Carl Linnaeus (1707–1778), the Swedish physician, botanist, and zoologist says The Afer or Africanus: black, phlegmatic, relaxed; black, frizzled hair; silky skin, flat nose, tumid lips; females without shame; mammary glands give milk abundantly; crafty, sly, careless; anoints himself with grease; and regulated by will.

Scottish lawyer Henry Home, Lord Kames (1696-1782) was a polygenist: he believed God had created different races on Earth in separate regions. In his 1734 book Sketches on the History of Man, Home claimed that the environment, climate, or state of society could not account for racial differences, so the races must have come from distinct, separate stocks.

Charles Darwin (1809 – 19 April 1882) apparently believed that the struggle for existence among humans would result in racial extermination. In Descent of Man he asserted, "At some future period, not very distant as measured by centuries, the civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace throughout the world the savage races.

When comparing Caucasians to Negroes, Voltaire (1694 – 1778) compared them to different breeds of dog:
The Negro race is a species of men different from ours as the breed of spaniels is from that of greyhounds. The mucous membrane, or network, which Nature has spread between the muscles and the skin, is white in us and black or copper-colored in them.

Benjamin Rush (1745–1813), a Founding Father of the United States and a physician, proposed that being black was a hereditary skin disease, which he called "negroidism," and that it could be cured. Rush believed non-whites were white underneath, but they were stricken with a non-contagious form of leprosy which darkened their skin color. Rush drew the conclusion that "Whites should not tyrannize over [blacks], for their disease should entitle them to a double portion of humanity. However, by the same token, whites should not intermarry with them, for this would tend to infect posterity with the 'disorder'... attempts must be made to cure the disease.

The German anatomist Johann Blumenbach (1752–1840) was a believer in monogenism, the concept that all races have a single origin. He also believed in the "degeneration theory" of racial backgrounds. He said that Adam and Eve were Caucasian and that other races came about by degeneration from environmental factors, such as the sun and poor dieting and believed that the degeneration could be reversed if proper environmental control was taken and that all contemporary forms of man could revert to the original Caucasian race. According to Blumenbach, there are five races, all belonging to a single species: Caucasian, Mongolian, Ethiopian, American, and Malay. Blumenbach said: I have allotted the first place to the Caucasian because this stock displays the most beautiful race of men.


O.K. O.K., enough already! I told you it wasn't going to be pretty.

The beliefs these so-called scholars had is the single most reason why millions of Negroes were tortured, murdered and raped throughout history. Scientist published their findings as fact and people all over the world believed them.

But we wonder what the scientist would say if alive today with access to a computer, and visit Google to type in the key phrase "African immigrants in college" they would discover that these same Africans out-perform academically every single race in America's colleges.

That's interesting, but what does it prove?

It proves that intelligence is not dependent on skin color or race, but instead access to education and a fertile mind to receive instruction. In America, slavery happened years ago but damaged and demoralized the fertile minds of many black Americans, and continues down to this day. There are some blacks who think of education and learning as a white thing and don't want anything to do with it, now if that's not an effect of slavery I don't know what is.

Doesn't It boggles the mind that these so-called superior, intelligent and civilized humans didn't for one time think to share their knowledge of enlightenment with the world so all could live a better life, be happy and progress? No, sadly these people chose to claim white superiority, to dominate and to kill weaker ones similar to the barbarian way of life they came. An example of this is with Colonialism.

What is Colonialism?
Colonialism is the establishment, exploitation, maintenance, acquisition, and expansion of colony in one territory by a political power from another territory. It is a set of unequal relationships between the colonial power and the colony and often between the colonists and the indigenous population.

good whites Colonial rule in the Belgian Congo began in the late 19th century under King Leopold II of Belgium. Leopold exploited the Congo for its natural resources, first ivory and later rubber which was becoming a valuable commodity. The regime in the Congo was responsible for using forced labor, murder and mutilation to force native Congolese who did not fulfill quotas for rubber collections. It's estimated millions of Congolese died during this time.
In other words a much powerful nation sets up shop in a weaker nation by force and robs the resources and forces the natives to work as slaves for little or no pay while grossly benefiting from unequal trade activities while depositing profits to it's mother country.

Colonialism demoralized the native population making Europe stronger and Africa weaker. Even though many white nations participated, non-Europeans nations included, the United Kingdom was the king in this horrible act against humanity.

Because of whites belief in science aided with their secondary faith in religion, they felt they were obligated to save and civilize the world. Google "White man's Burden" for proof of this belief, and by the way our United States President Teddy Roosevelt loved the White Man's Burden theory.

Whites tend to have a poor memory in regards to their crimes against humanity, but the other nations who suffered through it haven't forgotten, because just like the effects of slavery still lingers for blacks in America, people who suffered through colonialism still feel the pain and can see with their literal eye the destruction it left behind.

There isn't any denying that science has also helped make our lives better, but the responsibility that goes along with it is simply too much for humans to handle. Whites did not temper science with love and common sense. Just look around the world today, and you would probably agree we are on the brink of destruction with pollution, nuclear weapons, degradation of the earth, etc. are all products of science. The bad far outweigh the good.

Early science also taught Europeans it was man's nature to compete. In fact, they felt it was healthy and natural to compete to create superior human beings, especially white ones. This erroneous belief about competition would go on to be the largest difference in European and African cultures.

Whites brought these competitive qualities and attitudes with them from Europe. Africans were totally opposite because in their homeland everything was shared and done for the tribal community. There wasn't an I in Africa, it was US.

Blacks played an enormous role in the building of this country, even with hands tied behind their backs but were not welcome to participate. Whites felt that it just didn't look and feel right for blacks to be associated with superior whites in the building of America. So white Americans kidnapped the U.S. Constitution and created laws (Jim Crow) to keep things entirely separate and achieved like crazy in all aspects of life, and boasting white superiority.

It has not been proven that competitiveness is better than teamwork. View this small list of words associated with competitiveness out of the dictionary and you'll have to agree this is the state of America today.

aggressive, brutal, cutthroat, every person for themselves, fierce, merciless, ruthless, unmerciful, vicious, voracious, without mercy, adverse, alien, argumentative, belligerent, bitter, cold, contentious, contrary, disapproving, dour, hateful, ill-disposed, inhospitable, inimical, malevolent, malicious, malignant, militant, nasty, ornery, pugnacious, rancorous, scrappy, sour, spiteful, unfriendly, unkind, unpropitious, unsociable, unsympathetic, unwelcoming, viperous, warlike.

More and more blacks have developed this competitive and lofty spirit and probably will soon look down on others as well, even within our race. Ole Blue Eyes, who was a great singer and real American who viewed each human being as equal had an incredible grip on the situation about the division between blacks and whites. Check out what he said below.

Frank Sinatra
photo#101-yr-1915

One of the greatest entertainers of all times, Frank Sinatra once made a quote about the damaging effects of ones who subscribe to white superiority whether covertly or overtly.

"We've got a hell of a long way to go in this racial situation. As long as most white men think of a Negro first and a man second, we're in trouble. I don't know why we can't grow up."


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Joseph B. Noil
While serving on USS Powhatan at Norfolk, Virginia on December 26, 1872, Joseph B. Noil
saved a drowning shipmate, Boatswain J.C. Walton. For his conduct on this occasion,
he was awarded the Medal of Honor.

photo #108-yr-1882


Frederick Bruce Thomas
Frederick Bruce Thomas
photo #104

Charlotte Ray
Charlotte Ray
photo #104

African American junk dealer
The former Freedman's Savings Bank on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.
photo #105-yr-1874

William Still
William Still
photo #106-yr-1902


Freedman's Bank 150th Anniversary Celebration



Underground Railroad: The William Still Story


     
Our Community in 1872

Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:


  • February 27, 1872 - Charlotte Ray was the first African-American female lawyer in the United States. Ray graduated from Howard University School of Law in 1872. She was also the first female admitted to the District of Columbia Bar, and the first woman admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. Trivia: Even though Charlotte was a very well respected and qualified attorney, she couldn't get work. Folks in her day didn't want to take a chance with a black lady handling their case, so she eventually went back to teaching.

  • Frederick Bruce Thomas was a Mississippi native and the son of former slaves who became a prominent citizen of Moscow and, later, Istanbul. Thomas left Mississippi for London, intending to work as a waiter. He then moved to Russia, where he ran a series of theaters and restaurants. During the Russian Revolution, he fled to Turkey, where he had less success in business and became in debt. He found himself unable to return to the United States and died in a Turkish prison. Trivia:You gotta admire this man. He sure didn't fit the stereotype.

  • The Freedman's Savings Bank, was a private corporation chartered by the U.S. government to encourage and guide the economic development of the newly emancipated African-American communities in the post-Civil War period. The bank's central office was located in Washington D.C., but had many branches throughout America, especially in the South. Although functioning only between 1865 and 1874, the company achieved notable successes as a leading financial institution of African-Americans. Its failure in 1874 was devastating to the newly emancipated black community. Trivia: With over 480,000 names on file, it make for the largest single repository of lineage-linked African-American records. The searchable database is available to amateur as well as professional genealogists.

  • African-American abolitionist William Still conductor on the Underground Railroad, writer, historian and civil rights activist directly aided fugitive slaves and kept records of their lives, to help families reunite after slavery was abolished. After the American Civil War, he wrote an account of the underground system and the experiences of many refugee slaves, entitled The Underground Railroad Records, published in 1872.

  • 1872 - Joseph B. Noil was a United States Navy sailor and a recipient of America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor. Trivia: In the Revolutionary War, America and the British promised the black slaves freedom if they fought for their respective sides. Of course, we all know that America won the war but failed to keep its promise to the slaves and forced them back into slavery. President George Washington had to know about this and did nothing on the slave's behalf. On the other hand, the British kept their promise and transported these slaves who were also called black loyalist to Nova Scotia and Sierra Leone, Africa to start a new life. Apparently, Joseph B. Noil was from these groups of blacks that settled there which means he was a free man when he arrived in America to fight for the Navy. Maybe since the Civil War had been fought and decided he figured it was worth leaving his home in Novia Scotia for a new America in what he thought would be free from racism and hate against black people.




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RESOURCES:


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#100 -   Public Domain image - By unattributed (West Virginia Archives & History) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#101 -   Public Domain image -By Published by Boston City Council [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#102 -   Public Domain image -By J.W. Loguen [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103 -   Public Domain image - By PDH at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

#104 -   Public Domain image - See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#105 -   Public Domain image - By Unknown artist [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#106 -   Public Domain image - Mathew Brady [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#107 -   Public Domain image - By anonymous/unknown (NYPL) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#108 -   Public Domain image - This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See this page for further explanation.



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