blast from the past

blast from the past
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  Navigation:   Features:


  Year by Year Search
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annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1864:
Susie Taylor
    What a great woman Susie Taylor was! Susie was born enslaved on a plantation in Liberty County, Georgia in the year 1848. At the age of seven years old she received permission from her master to live with her Grandmother Dolly, who lived in Savannah, Georgia. Susie and her Grandmother had an excellent relationship. Dolly, with whom Taylor lived for much of her childhood, supported Taylor's education by sending her to an illegal school run by a free African American woman, Mrs. Woodhouse.

    It was almost as if Susie had a unquenchable thirst for knowledge. You have to remember that Georgia had strict laws against blacks being taught, but luckily there were some brave souls who ignored those stupid laws. Taylor continued her education under the tutelage of various "teachers," both white and black, including playmates, and the son of her grandmother's landlord. From them, she gained the rudiments of literacy, then extended her education with the help of two white youths, both of whom knowingly violated law and custom. Susie reaped the benefits of her education by later helping others.

    She sought to help her own by teaching black children in the daytime and adults at night. She received no pay for her labors, just the satisfaction in knowing she was enriching people's life through education. She was also the first African American nurse in our country. During the civil war, she tended to the wounded.

    Susie married Edward King, a black officer in the First South Carolina Volunteers of African Descent, later named the 33rd United States Colored Troops on February 8, 1864, which was disbanded at Fort Wagner in 1866. For three years she moved with her husband's and brothers' regiment, serving as nurse and laundress, and teaching many of the black soldiers to read and write during their off-duty time.

    Add writer to her impressive resume. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences.

    This woman played an active part in fighting for her freedom. It had to make her heart glad when President Lincoln proclaimed all slaves were free. She was one of the first African Americans of the new America who set an extraordinary example. Just think about what she would have accomplished if she had a formal education.

    I'm sure many were watching and felt inspired by her life choices. If the President ever had any doubts about supporting the Emancipation Proclamation, all he had to do is take a look at Susie Taylor's life which proved that with proper education and desire, black folks could excel just as well as our other American brothers. There's not a better choice for our 1864 Hamite Award than Susie Taylor; she is a bright symbol of our new beginning.

annual hamite award
Susie Taylor
photo#104-yr-1864



Susie King Taylor pp 1 Neil Grimsley





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How were blacks feeling in 1864?
happy mood of blacks
The year 1864 had to be a very exciting year for black folks. The civil war was still going strong. Slavery had been abolished the previous year. There was no way blacks were going to lose this war. Finally, they would be able to gain complete acceptance and approval from their white American brothers. Their heroic bravery was well documented.

 jim crow
During this period, there was a perception about blacks being ignorant and lazy, and this was portrayed in the "Jumping Jim Crow" song (1828) that was very popular in America, and all over the world. Jim Crow became synonymous with the stereotypical lazy, ignorant black man and marked the beginning of the minstrel shows of the 1800s.

It's strange to be called ignorant when it was against the law for blacks to learn, and lazy when they toiled in fields from sunrise to sunset six days out of the week, yes that's very strange. Some white people had a hate and disgust for blacks. Thank goodness all whites weren't like that.

The year 1864 brought the first African-American doctor in America. Our brave black soldiers were making us so proud with their fierce fighting and courage, all 179,000 of these brave soldiers knew they were fighting for the dignity and respect of all blacks and their eventual citizenship.

George Washington Carver would be born this year and another example of an intelligent black man who even through hostility went on to become one of the most widely admired and respected scientist of his day and in the process put another dent in that white superiority rubbish.

Last but not least, Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving as an official holiday. Thanksgiving was and is a special holiday for many blacks in America. Thanks, Abe.



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racist newspaper articles

Authentic newspaper article for the year 1864
Get a feel for what was really happening in 1864

1864  usa  newspaper articles 1864  usa  newspaper articles
1864  usa  newspaper articles 1864  usa  newspaper articles
In some cases, the Confederates forced their African American slaves to fire upon U.S. soldiers at gunpoint. One such slave John who was forced by the Confederates to fight U.S. soldiers was quoted as saying, "Our masters tried all they could to make us fight... They promised to give us our freedom and money besides, but none of us believed them; we only fought because we had to." Parker stated that had he been given an opportunity, he would have turned against his Confederate captors, and "could do it with pleasure".


1864  usa  newspaper articles An 1864 cartoon lampooning the Confederacy's deliberating on the use of black soldiers, showing them defecting en masse towards U.S. lines if such proposals were adopted.

The Nashville daily union. (Nashville, Tenn.), 09 Nov. 1864. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025718/

Public Domain Image




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african american first

 For the year 1864:
  • Rebecca Lee Crumpler, was the first African-American woman to become a physician in the United States: New England Female Medical College.




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black civil war soldiers




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african american jockeys

Octavius Catto
Octavius Valentine Catto
photo #121-yr-1863

      Sports in 1864
    Trivia:
  • Blacks were not accepted into the league baseball games, so they started their own teams, becoming professional by the the 1870s. The first known baseball game between two black teams was held on November 15, 1859, in New York City. The Henson Base Ball Club of Jamaica, Queens, defeated the Unknowns of Weeksville, Brooklyn, 54 to 43.

    By the end of the 1860s, the black baseball mecca was Philadelphia, which had an African-American population of 22,000. Two former cricket players, James H. Francis and Francis Wood, formed the Pythian Base Ball Club. They played in Camden, New Jersey, at the landing of the Federal Street Ferry, because it was difficult to get permits for black baseball games in the city. Octavius Catto, the promoter of the Pythians, decided to apply for membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players, normally a matter of sending delegates to the annual convention; beyond that, a formality.

    At the end of the 1867 season "the National Association of Baseball Players voted to exclude any club with a black player." In some ways Blackball thrived under segregation, with the few black teams of the day playing not only each other but white teams as well. "Black teams earned the bulk of their income playing white independent 'semipro' clubs."


  • The mistreatment and segregation of Blacks didn't only happen in the South, but also the Northern cities like Philadelphia.



  • Octavius Valentine Catto was a black educator, intellectual, and civil rights activist in Philadelphia. As a man, he also became known as a top cricket and black baseball pioneer in 19th-century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.




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Political caricature. No. 4, The miscegenation ball
Political caricature. "Miscegenation or the Millenium of Abolitionism"


Recruiting Colored Regiments
View of transparency for Recruiting Colored Regiments



     Political Scene in 1864
  • Miscegenation:
    The mixing or blending of race in marriage or breeding, interracial marriage

    The above image is the fourth in the Bromley series of anti-Republican satires. As in no. 2 of the series, "Miscegenation or the Millenium of Abolitionism" the artist plays on Northern fears of racial intermingling. Here, white men are dancing and flirting with black women in a large hall.

    Black women are definitely among the most beautiful women on earth, not many could argue with that. But this image shows the mindset of many people back in 1864. It seems blacks were not looked upon and treated as human or another person.

    But the truth of the matter is that especially during slavery, blacks always knew they were human, yes they understood they were a real live person, not an animal or savage. They had feelings and emotions like anyone else, but you couldn't tell that to many hateful whites back in the day.

    During this period, whites were considered superior because of their intelligence, and it wasn't because of any special abilities they possessed. The majority chose to use their intelligence for selfish and personal gain. Because of intelligence, it was very easy for them to dominate other races, such as tribal Africans and Indians.

    But why did whites have the upper hand on intelligence and education? Simply because of early Europeans, even though they may have had differences amongst themselves still understood the importance of networking and sharing information to promote education. Africans and Natives were from a different mindset and always fought with one another without any vision or regard for their people's future.

    But the truth of the matter is if Europeans would have left the African alone and not used their intelligence to kidnap slaves to America, then this website would not exist. But like mentioned earlier they chose to use their intelligence for selfish gain, resulting in a large population of black people in America, which is our beloved home now as much as anybody.

    But time would reveal something very wonderful and that there were many blacks in history who went on to accomplish great things, and even under a hostile environment, so it wasn't like blacks didn't have the ability to learn. There is no denial that intelligence can be a beautiful thing, especially if shared to uplift and assist others, but on the other hand, it can also be evil, and wicked thing as these self-righteous early anti-Americans chose to use it for.


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    Emancipation Celebration on Display:
  • The display celebrated the emancipation of slaves in Maryland through the state's new constitution, adopted on October 13 of the same year. At the top of the transparency is a bell draped with bunting and surmounted by an American flag. On each side of it is a lit oil lamp. Beneath the bell, in bold letters, are the words "God Save the Republic." Immediately below this is a large battle scene where black troops storm an enemy redoubt, with the commentary, "Never in field or tent scorn a black regiment." Below the scene are quotations from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry, affirming the idea of emancipation.

    Four smaller scenes appear at right and left of a central panel (clockwise from upper left): 1. "Before Fort Wagner, July 11th, 1863," where a dying black Union standard-bearer gives up the flag to another, saying, "Boys!! I never once let the old flag touch the ground." 2. "Struggle for a Rebel battle flag at New Market Heights, Near Richmond, Sept. 29th, 1864.--Maj. Genl. Butler," in which a black soldier bayonets a Confederate, saying, "Sic Semper tyrannies." 3. "In St. Mary's County, Maryland," showing a black woman pointing out a schoolhouse to two black children saying, "Tis education forms the Common Mind." A subtitle reads, "12,000 colored soldiers from Maryland now at the front fighting for the Union." 4. A slave auction, with the note that thousands of women and children were sold to the far South annually under Maryland's old constitution. A quote attributed to Homer above the scene reads, "God fixed it certain that whatever day / Makes the man a slave takes half his worth away."

    In the center of the transparency is an arch composed of blocks with the names of various virtues, supported by two columns, the one on the right labeled "Faith." The keystone of the arch is Justice. Above it are AndrewJackson's famous words, "The Union must and shall be preserved." Various texts exemplifying Maryland's tradition of religious and personal freedom appear inside the arch. Below are portraits of Abraham Lincoln and an unidentified man.

  • (view larger image)




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HOW LONG WILL GOOD WHITE-AMERICANS
SIT ON THE FENCE?




whites sitting on fence


Since the beginning of American history, there's always been a fight between good and bad. The problem is that both good and bad forces claim to adore democracy. Someone is lying. You be the judge.


First, we need to define democracy and we'll let two of America's greatest Presidents do this for us by their actions and famous quotes.


Abraham Lincoln made the following quotes:

"As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this to the extent of the difference, is no democracy."

"I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races.... But I hold that ... there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence, the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."


Now it's very clear from the many biased comments Abraham Lincoln made against black people he wasn't the type that would have blacks over for dinner, in fact, most whites shared his views many years ago. But that's okay, at least he was honest. This site believes he would have changed his racist views if living in our time because one of his most admirable qualities was flexibility.


In contrast to Abraham Lincoln, the first President of the United States, George Washington didn't share Lincoln's view of democracy.


Black slaves were actively sought and recruited to fight for America in the Revolutionary War and promised citizenship after the victory. It's well recorded that slaves fought with courage and valor that ensured American success. George Washington himself made the comment:

Washington wrote a letter to Colonel Henry Lee III stating that success in the war would come to whatever side could arm the blacks the fastest.


whites sitting on fence

But after victory in the war, America didn't keep it promises, and most blacks were forced back into slavery. Of course, George Washington had to know about this but did nothing. Washington was a brilliant soldier but failed as an upholder of truth and justice and set the tone for future race relations in our country by trivializing and compromising real Democracy.


Washington had many slaves himself and didn't want to free them and damage his financial stake. He put money interests ahead of real Democracy. But all of America's founders didn't feel this way. A contemporary of Washington and future President John Adams hated slavery and was proud to boast he handled his business with paid workers. Did George Washington look at himself in the mirror and feel guilty about compromising (true) American Democracy? History says he didn't.


Washington created the blueprint for this distorted view of true Democracy


Blacks in the colonies had been treated poorly since their arrival from Africa, but this action by Washington made it official. This blueprint became the norm in much of America's dealings with black people. Whites felt if their supreme leader thought so lowly of black people, they would also.


We must all be honest with ourselves in admitting this view of Democracy was not American because it denied certain humans liberty, justice and the pursuit of happiness. Therefore we must call for what it was, which is Anti-American.


So we had two different Presidents with various versions of Democracy, and this is the way it remains today. What made Lincoln a force for good and better President was he put Democracy first and his personal prejudices second, but Washington put his financial interest ahead of true Democracy. This is what set these two men apart. Both were great men with different views about what it meant to be an American on the side of liberty and justice for all.


After Lincoln's death, democracy would take a downward spiral. One of the most biased President in American history led the attack. His name was Andrew Johnson, and he fought against the Civil Rights of blacks tooth and nail. Every favorable bill for former slaves that appeared on his desk was immediately denied. Later, there were new laws created to restrict black American citizens that worked very well. This was called the Jim Crow era. It was an all-out attack on Democracy by Anti-Americans and aided by good white Americans who remained on the fence. Read for yourself.


There's not enough room on this web page to describe the hate and exclusion by government and white Americans against blacks during this period. Jim Crow laws touched every part of life, all across America. Blacks and whites were kept apart as much as possible. Good jobs went to whites; blacks were given the worst with less pay. Many industries wouldn’t hire blacks. Many unions passed special rules to exclude them. All juries and judges were white; blacks were illegally denied voting rights. No blacks allowed in public pools. Many restaurants would not serve blacks, and those that did had a dirty colored section. Blacks and whites went to county fairs on different days. Blacks couldn't use public libraries. Simple common courtesy was rarely shown the blacks. Whites beat, tortured, raped and killed blacks with no fear of punishment. Blacks were denied credit for businesses, housing, cars by the banks. Blacks were kept out of white neighborhoods with housing covenants. Oklahoma had black and white phone booths. Texas had cities where blacks were entirely restricted from living. Blacks could not leave their homes after 10:00 pm in Mobile Alabama. Blacks could not marry whites. Georgia had separate white and black parks. Prisons, hospitals, and orphanages were segregated as were schools and colleges. Blacks and whites had to use separate sets of books in school, in Florida, they couldn't be stored together. When a person was sworn in at a trial, the whites used one Bible, and the blacks had a separate Bible. For those who did complete college, a crucial question had to be answered. Who was going to be their clients? Whites didn't engage blacks in business, and the battered Negro couldn't afford their services. These laws became so entrenched in American life; even unwritten laws affected black citizenship; blacks understood to stay out of white stores and establishments. Segregation was so complete that whites did not see blacks except when being served by them. After the Civil Rights movement of the 60s, blacks have made enormous gains. This is how the United States of America became a polarized country. Each and every President knew what was going on and allowed this illegal activity for 87 years. Were they guilty of not upholding the United States Constitution in the Negroes behalf? Is this the reason why many other nations laugh at America with its constant claims of being on the side of good and high morality?



Did religion made things worse?


Even though the U.S. was not founded as a Christian nation and existed solely as a secular state completely free of religious influence in lawmaking, religion would soon be thrown into the loop. This made American people feel righteous and just in their own eyes. White's beleived they were "good" and made in God's image and blacks were not. In time slogans such as "In God We Trust" were printed on money to describe a people who had snuffed out Democracy, They felt God was on their side and loved only them.


Countless movies, radio shows, newspapers, magazines and other media would consistently portray these Anti-Americans as on the side of good, morally upstanding and righteous to the world with God on their side. Good white Americans had to know this was a farce because of the way it's black citizens were being treated and did nothing.


There were a relative few brave, good white Americans who spoke up during this period and got involved with some even losing their lives, but the majority did nothing. They remained on the fence because they were also partakers of the privileged American way of living and failed to realize how this was undermining true Democracy with the threat of one day being faced with an America they wouldn't recognize.


whites sitting on fence


“Ignorance of how we are shaped racially is the first sign of privilege. In other words. It is a privilege to ignore the consequences of race in America.” Tim Wise


So, what now?


Because of the folly of racism and privilege by Anti-Americans and the lack of action to speak out for true Democracy by good Americans, has our country morphed into another form of power? Something that is completely different than it started out as, perhaps like an insatiable, detestable and ugly monster, without a soul or conscience? You be the judge.


whites sitting on fence





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Colored troops near Dutch Gap
Dutch Gap, Virginia. Picket station of Colored troops near Dutch Gap canal - November 1864
photo#105


22th Regt. U.S. Colored Troops
22th Regt. U.S. Colored Troops
photo#106

Battle of Fort Pillow
Battle of Fort Pillow
photo#107

United States Colored Infantry in 1864

    The Corps d'Afrique, one of many Louisiana Union Civil War units, was formed in New Orleans after the city was taken and occupied by Union forces. It was formed in part from the Louisiana Native Guards. The Native Guards were former militia units raised in New Orleans. They were property-owning free people of color (gens du couleur libres)

    Despite class differences between freeborn and freedmen the troops of the Corps d'Afrique served with distinction, including at the Battle of Port Hudson and throughout the South. Its units included:

  • 4 Regiments of Louisiana Native Guards (renamed the 1st-4th Corps d'Afrique Infantry, later made into the 73rd-76th US Colored Infantry on April 4, 1864).

  • 22 Regiments of Infantry (1st-20th, 22nd, and 26th Corps d'Afrique Infantry, later converted into the 77th-79th, 80th-83rd, 84th-88th, and 89th-93rd US Colored Infantry on April 4, 1864).

  • 5 Regiments of Engineers (1st-5th Corps d'Afrique Engineers, later converted into the 95th-99th US Colored Infantry regiments on April 4, 1864).

  • 1 Regiment of Heavy Artillery (later converted into the 10th US Colored (Heavy) Artillery on May 21, 1864).


  • Awards:
  • 13 African-American soldiers, including Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood and Sergeant Alfred B. Hilton (mortally wounded) of the 4th USCT, were awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions at the Battle of Chaffin's Farm in September 1864, during the campaign to take Petersburg.

  • Corporal Andrew Jackson Smith of the 55th Massachusetts (Colored) Volunteer Infantry was recommended for the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Honey Hill in November 1864. Smith prevented the regimental colors from falling into enemy hands after the color sergeant was killed. Due to a lack of official records, was not awarded the medal until 2001.


  • Fort Pillow massacre:
  • The Battle of Fort Pillow, also known as the Fort Pillow massacre, was fought on April 12, 1864, at Fort Pillow on the Mississippi River in Henning, Tennessee, during the American Civil War. The 6th U.S. Regiment Colored Heavy Artillery which numbered close to 300 men along with the same amount of white Union soldiers were badly out-numbered and massacred after throwing down their weapons in surrender. This caused a big backlash with Union officials with Military historian David J. Eicher concluded, "Fort Pillow marked one of the bleakest, saddest events of American military history.




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Numbers of United States Colored Troops by state
North & South


North Number South Number
Connecticut 1,764 Alabama 4,969
Colorado Territory 95 Arkansas 5,526
Delaware 954 Florida 1,044
District of Columbia 3,269 Georgia 3,486
Illinois 1,811 Louisiana 24,502
Indiana 1,597 Mississippi 17,869
Iowa 440 North Carolina 5,035
Kansas 2,080 South Carolina 5,462
Kentucky 23,703 Tennessee 20,133
Maine 104 Texas 47
Maryland 8,718 Virginia 5,723
Massachusetts 3,966
Michigan 1,387 Total from South 93,796
Minnesota 104
Missouri 8,344 At large 733
New Hampshire 125 Not accounted for 5,083
New Jersey 1,185
New York 4,125
Ohio 5,092
Pennsylvania 8,612
Rhode Island 1,837
Vermont 120
West Virginia 196
Wisconsin 155
Total from North 79,283
Total 178,895
 



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Robert Blake

Robert Blake was a Union Navy sailor during the American Civil War and a recipient of America's highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor. Blake was the second African American to perform a Medal of Honor action; William Harvey Carney was the first. Blake was the first African American to actually receive a Medal of Honor - his was presented to him in 1864, while Carney did not receive his until 1900. But, because Carney's Medal of Honor action occurred first, Carney, not Blake, is usually credited with being the first African American Medal of Honor recipient.



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The Race Factor

racism

     Race in 1864
    The Cleburne Memorial:
    The race was at issue here, otherwise, it would not have been a problem in arming slaves. The Cleburne Memorial was named after General Patrick Cleburne, who was an Army of Tennessee division commander. At a officers meeting on January 2, 1864, and after many Confederate losses, Cleburne proposed to arm the slaves and enlist them in the Confederate army.

    This proposal didn't sit well with many Confederates officials who debated the issue back and forth. American political figure Howell Cobb warned, “If slaves will make good soldiers, then our whole theory of slavery is wrong.” They would offer the enlisted slaves freedom for their loyal service, but not abolish the institution of slavery itself.

    After much debate and on the verge of total defeat the Confederate army signed into law a measure that would arm and enlist slaves to fight, even forming the first black company in Richmond Virginia. But it was much too late because The Confederate capital fell just over one week later, and General Lee surrendered to the Union commander, General Ulysses S. Grant, on April 9, 1865.




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famous african american birthdays

George Washington Carver
George Washington Carver
photo#102-yr-1943

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson
Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson
photo #110-yr-1901

     Famous Birthdays in 1864
  • April 16, 1864 - Flora Batson   was a well known concert singer.

  • July 12, 1864 - George Washington Carver was an African-American botanist who worked in agricultural extension in the southern United States.

  • 1864 - Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson was an American physician who in 1891 became the first female African-American doctor in Alabama.




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famous african american deaths

Myrtilla Miner
Myrtilla Miner
photo #112

     Famous Deaths in 1864
  • October 21, 1864 - Alfred B. Hilton was a Union Army soldier during the American Civil War and a recipient of America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions at the Battle of Chaffin's Farm.

  • December 17, 1864 - Myrtilla Miner was an American educator and abolitionist whose school for African American girls, established against considerable opposition, grew to a successful and long-lived teachers institution. Trivia: This woman was a fierce supporter of education for African Americans of her day, and could not be intimidated by local public opinion. A true visionary and 100% genuine American.




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soul music orgin


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Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
photo #102-yr-1876

Thomas Wentworth Higginson
During the Civil War, Thomas Wentworth Higginson served as colonel of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, the first federally authorized black regiment, from 1862–1864. Following the war, Higginson devoted much of the rest of his life to fighting for the rights of freed slaves, women and other disfranchised peoples.
photo #118-yr-1863

John Brown Song
John Brown Song
photo #119-yr-1863

     Music in 1864
    Popular Songs:
  • Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield dubbed "The Black Swan", was an African-American singer considered the best-known black concert artist of her time. She was noted by James M. Trotter for her "remarkably sweet tones and wide vocal compass". She toured and conducted a Philadelphia music studio. Among her voice pupils was Thomas Bowers, who became known as "The Colored Mario" and "The American Mario" for the similarity of his voice to Italian opera tenor Giovanni Mario.



  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson:
  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson leads the First South Carolina Colored Volunteers, the first group of authorized African American soldiers. Higginson is a notable author who helps popularize many aspects of African American music. He contributed to the preservation of Negro spirituals by copying dialect verses and music he heard sung around the regiment's campfires.


  • John Brown's Song:
  • is a United States marching song about the abolitionist John Brown. The song was popular in the Union during the American Civil War.


  • "Juba Juba", a popular song about the Juba:

    Juba dis and Juba dat,
    and Juba killed da yellow cat,
    You sift the meal and ya gimme the husk,
    you bake the bread and ya gimme the crust,
    you eat the meat and ya gimme the skin,
    and that's the way,
    my mama's troubles begin


    A song about the hambone from Step it Down (v.s.):

    Hambone Hambone pat him on the shoulder
    If you get a pretty girl, I'll show you how to hold her.
    Hambone, Hambone, where have you been?
    All 'round the world and back again.
    Hambone, Hambone, what did you do?
    I got a train and I fairly flew.
    Hambone, Hambone where did you go?
    I hopped up to Miss Lucy's door.
    I asked Miss Lucy would she marry me.
    (falsetto)"Well I don't care if Papa don't care!"
    First come in was Mister Snake,
    He crawled all over that wedding cake.
    Next walked in was Mister Tick,
    He ate so much it made him sick.
    Next walked in was Mister Coon,
    We asked him to sing us a wedding tune,
    Now Ham-....
    Now Ham....




  Popular Soul Dances:
  • The Juba or Hambone dance was originally from West Africa. It became an African-American plantation dance that was performed by slaves during their gatherings when no rhythm instruments were allowed due to fear of secret codes hidden in the drumming.





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pretty lady cooking
Hi there, I'm Annie.
Thanks for viewing my collection of wonderful soul-food dishes that my amazing ancestors cooked, and more than likely yours did too.

We didn't have much of anything back in the day and had to live off the scraps we were given. But like a famous rapper once said in his songs, we knew how to "make a dollar out of 15 cents" Enjoy.



sweet potatoes
Sweet Potatoes / Yams


Barbecue Ribs
Barbecue Ribs


Ham Hocks
Ham Hocks


Rice and Beans
Rice and Beans


Fish and Chips
Fish and Chips


Bean Soup
Bean Soup


Biscuits and Gravy
Biscuits and Gravy


Waffles
Waffles


Fried Chicken
Fried Chicken


Cornbread
Cornbread


Collard Greens
Collard Greens


Fried Liver
Fried Liver


Peach Preserves
Peach Preserves


Pinto Beans
Pinto Beans


Pound Cake
Pound Cake


Pork Chops
Pork Chops


Watermelon
Watermelon


black man hungry


(images - https://pixabay.com/)
Southern Cooking - Soul Food

    Have you ever wondered what African-Americans ate back in the day? Well, maybe we can help you with that. We've found the oldest known black cookbook to date.

    This cookbook was written by an actual former slave woman that had once lived on a plantation, but gained her freedom with the Emancipation Proclamation moving from Mobile, Alabama to San Francisco, California where she published an entirely excellent collection of 160 authentic and tasty recipes of the Old South entitled;

    "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking"

    This book is indeed a rare gemstone with tons of actual recipes that black folks enjoyed back in the day, but Mrs. Fisher cooking wasn't limited to blacks only, many whites also loved her delicious recipes and persuaded her to make a cookbook.

    Here is just a sample of some of the southern foods mentioned in her book, and by the way, it wasn't called soul-food until the 1960's.

    Breakfast
  • Maryland Beat Biscuit
  • Waffles
  • Cream Cake
  • Flannel Cakes
  • Sallie Lund
  • Egg Corn Bread
  • Plantation Corn Bread
  • Light Bread


  • Broiled Meats
  • Beefsteak
  • Lamb or Mutton Chops
  • Pork Steak or Chops
  • Venison


  • Croquettes
  • Lamb
  • Chicken
  • Crab
  • Liver
  • Oyster
  • Fish


  • Cakes Etc.
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Almond
  • Feather
  • Sponge
  • Fruit
  • Jelly
  • Carolas
  • Ginger Cookies
  • Sweet Wafers


  • Pickels, Sauces Etc.
  • Sweet Cucumber Pickles
  • Sweet Cucumber Mangoes
  • Chow Chow
  • Creole Chow Chow
  • Cherry Chutney
  • Game Sauce
  • Compound Tomato
  • Napoleon
  • Sweet Pickle Peaches
  • Sweet Pickle Prunes
  • Sweet Watermelon Kind Pickle
  • Sauce for Boiled Fish or Mutton
  • Milanese Sauce
  • Sauce for Suet Pudding


  • Pies, Etc.
  • Pastry for making Pies of all kinds
  • Preparing the Fruit for Pies
  • Rhubarb
  • Apple
  • Peach
  • Lemon Pies
  • Cocoanut
  • Cream Apple
  • Sweet Potato
  • Gooseberry and Cherry
  • Light Bread
  • Mince
  • Blackberry Roll
  • Oyster


  • Puddings
  • Snow
  • Plum
  • Corn
  • Corn Fritters
  • Batter
  • Rice
  • Yorkshire
  • Cheese
  • Suet


  • Preserves, Spices, ETC.
  • Brandy Peaches
  • Quince Preserves
  • Syrups for Preserves
  • Preserved Peaches
  • Preserved Pears
  • Currant Jelly
  • Cranberry Jelly
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Raspberry and Currant Jam Combined
  • Marmalade Peach
  • Crab Apple Jelly
  • Blackberry Brandy
  • Blackberry Syrup for Dysentery in Children
  • Preserved Apricots
  • Apple Sauce for Roast Pork
  • Charlotte Eusse
  • Spiced Currants
  • Preserved Cherries


  • Roast Meats
  • Venison
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Pig
  • Veal
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Birds
  • Quail
  • Domestic Duck
  • Wild Duck


  • Salads
  • Chicken
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Shrimp
  • Crab
  • Meat


  • Sherbets
  • Orange
  • Lemon
  • Pineapple


  • Soups, Chowders, Etc.
  • Beef
  • Ox-TaH
  • Calf 's Head
  • Mock Turtle
  • Green Turtle
  • Oyster Gumbo
  • Ochra Gumbo
  • Old Fashioned Turnip
  • Chicken
  • Corn and Tomato
  • Creole
  • Fish Chowder
  • Chicken Gumbo


  • Miscellaneous
  • Fricassed Chicken
  • Fried Chicken
  • Chicken fried Steak
  • Meat Stews or Entrees
  • Ice Cream
  • Boiled Turkey
  • Beef a la Mode
  • Neckbones
  • Spiced Round
  • Hog Maws
  • Stuffed Ham
  • Lima Beans
  • Jumberlie a Creole Dish
  • Baked Fish
  • Ribs, Beef or Pork
  • Boiled Corn
  • Peach Cobbler
  • Egg Plant Stuffed
  • Chitterlings or "Chitlins"
  • Corned Beef Hash
  • Ladies' Custard
  • Tonic Bitters
  • Terrapin Stew
  • Leaven Biscuit
  • Pap for infant Diet
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Cracklins
  • Meringue for Pudding
  • Circuit Hash


  • What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking
    Paperback – March, 1995
    by Abby Fisher (Author), Karen Hess (Editor)

    http://www.amazon.com/Fisher-Knows-About-Southern-Cooking/dp/1557094039

 

Southern Jewel Million Dollar Pound Cake
(this recipe is not from Mrs. Fisher cookbook, but has been in Annie's family for generations, it's everyones favorite!)

    Butter: 1 pound
    Sugar: 3 cups
    Eggs: 6
    Milk: 3/4 cup
    Cake Flour: 4 cups (Soft as Silk Cake Flour)
    Baking Powder: 1 teaspoon
    Vanilla Flavor: 1 teaspoon
    Lemon Flavor: 1 teaspoon

    Directions:
    For best results, leave butter and eggs out overnight
    Cream butter well, add sugar and mix until butter and sugar look like whip cream.
    Beat each egg individually and then add with sugar and butter, mix well for at least a couple minutes.
    Add milk and cake flour a little at a time, then add flavorings.
    Spray Pam spray on entire round cake pan, and then add cake batter.
    Bake about 1 hour and 15 minutes at 325.
    Let cake cool for about 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan.



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 African American mens fashion in 1864
Men's Fashion in 1864
photo #109-yr-1864

 African American womens fashion in 1864
Women's Fashion in 1864
photo #110-yr-1864

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly The person who drew this Illustration was kind to black people. Usually during that time period they would portray the Negro with wild hair and humongous noses with exaggerated lips. They made us look normal. Thank you Harper's.
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869

     Fashions in 1864

  Popular Fashions:

    1860s fashion was European-influenced clothing is characterized by extremely full-skirted women's fashions relying on crinolines and hoops and the emergence of "alternative fashions" under the influence of the Artistic Dress movement. In men's fashion, the three-piece ditto suit of sack coat, waistcoat, and trousers in the same fabric emerged as a novelty.





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 African American woman holding a basket
Company E, 4th United States Colored Infantry. Theirs was one of the detachments assigned to guard the nation's capital during the American Civil War of 1864

Anderson Ruffin Abbott
Anderson Ruffin Abbott
photo #114-yr-1913

William Harvey Carney
William Harvey Carney
photo #108-yr-1908

Our Community in 1864

    Excitement is in the air, slavery abolished last year but the battle is not over, we have to kick Confederate butt, and our brave black soilders are going beyond the call of duty to accomplish that!

  • March 1, 1864 Rebecca Lee Crumpler was named a Doctor of Medicine, making her the first African American woman in the United States to earn the degree, and the only African American woman to graduate from New England Female Medical College. The school closed in 1873, without graduating another black woman.

  • In June 1864 Congress granted equal pay to the U.S. Colored Troops and made the action retroactive. Black soldiers received the same rations and supplies. In addition, they received comparable medical care.

  • The National Convention of Colored Citizens of the United states met in Syracuse, New York in October, 1864. Its Address to the People of the United States was written by Fredereick Douglass.

  • President Abraham Lincoln formally establishes Thanksgiving as a national holiday.

  • On October 4, 1864, The New Orleans Tribune becomes the first black daily newspaper.

  • On September 30, 1864, Black soldiers are given the US Medal of Honor.

  • June 1864 - William Harvey Carney received an honorable discharge due to disability as a result of his wounds suffered in the Civil War.

  • 1864 - Anderson Ruffin Abbott   applied for a commission as an assistant surgeon, in the Union Army, in February 1863. His offer was not accepted, so in April he applied to be a “medical cadet” in the United States Colored Troops, before finally entering service as a civilian surgeon under contract. He served in Washington, D.C., from June 1863 to August 1865, starting at the recently opened Freedmen's Hospital (or Contraband Hospital) before moving to a hospital in Arlington, Virginia. One of only thirteen black surgeons to serve in the American Civil War, Abbott received numerous commendations and becoming popular in Washington society. This fostered a friendly relationship between Abbott and President Lincoln. On the night of Lincoln's assassination, Abbott accompanied Elizabeth Keckley to attend the stricken president at Petersen House. After Lincoln's death, Mary Todd Lincoln presented Abbott with the plaid shawl that Lincoln had worn to his 1861 inauguration.




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RESOURCES:


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#104 -   See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#105 -   See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#106 -   By David Bustill Bowser (died 1900) (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98506803/) [Public domain, Public domain, Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#107 -  This image is in the public domain in the United States. In most cases, this means that it was first published prior to January 1, 1923 (see the template documentation for more cases). Other jurisdictions may have other rules, and this image might not be in the public domain outside the United States. See Wikipedia:Public domain and Wikipedia:Copyrights for more details. PD-US Public domain in the United States //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:FTPILLO4.JPG

#108 -   By From the collections of the Library of Congress [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#109 -  "Published photographs in this collection were created before 1923 and are therefore in the public domain. Unpublished photographs in this collection are also in the public domain as Mathew Brady died in 1896 and Levin C. Handy died in 1932."

#110 -  See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#111 -  Edward Williams Clay [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#112 -  See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


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